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Thread: How I updated M6 without losing it.

  1. #1

    Default How I updated M6 without losing it.

    Updating M6 from the factory OSS repo resulted in the system I had updated
    being removed from the GRUB menu. Here is the way I achieved a safe update
    to a new installation. There are probably others but this worked for me.

    After achieving a safe update -
    (1) Log on to Root. This cuts down on extra actions which may - and have in
    my case - freeze the system before you can repair it.

    (2) Set up the factory OSS as your only enabled repository.

    (3) Install all new updates via YAST.

    (4)* Check boot menu in YAST. You'll probably see that the system you're on
    is no longer there.

    (5) Rename /boot/grub/menu.lst

    (6) Rename /boot/grub/menu.lst.OLD to menu.lst

    (7)* In YAST, check boot menu is now OK.

    (8) Final check - reboot!

    Steps marked with "*" are optional.

    --
    Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks., UK. E-mail: newsman not newsboy
    "I wear the cheese. It does not wear me."

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    You lost me. How does one log in as root to a system that has been removed from grub?

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    Quote Originally Posted by pilotgi View Post
    You lost me. How does one log in as root to a system that has been removed from grub?
    if i read this right he logged in as root before he did the updates

  4. #4

    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    Havoc65 wrote:

    >
    > pilotgi;2032033 Wrote:
    >> You lost me. How does one log in as root to a system that has been
    >> removed from grub?


    Sorry, I see where I made an error.

    > if i read this right he logged in as root before he did the updates
    >


    Exactly! My first attempt at an update lost the Grub entry. I then made a
    second clean installation and updated from my home session. I checked Grub
    and found it was screwed - as expected - so logged on to root to rename the
    files, only to have the system freeze solid. It was after my third
    installation - making sure that automatic logon was disabled - that I
    performed the updates and corrections in root. This procedure worked on both
    machines I've installed M6 on.

    Here's a corrected version. Hope this makes more sense:

    (1) Make a clean install of M6 from DVD, making sure that automatic logon is
    disabled.

    (2) Log on to Root. This cuts down on extra actions which may freeze the
    system before you can repair it.

    (3) Set up the factory OSS as your only enabled repository.

    (4) Install all new updates via YAST.

    (5) Check boot menu in YAST. You'll probably see that the system you're on
    is no longer there.

    (6) Rename /boot/grub/menu.lst

    (7) Rename /boot/grub/menu.lst.OLD to menu.lst

    (8) In YAST, check boot menu is now OK.

    (9) Final check - reboot!



    --
    Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks., UK. E-mail: newsman not newsboy
    "I wear the cheese. It does not wear me."

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    I must say, logging in as root on a desktop environment? Don't ever.

    Since M6 messed up my GRUB as well, here's the simple solution:

    Found out GRUB was messed up in a way that laptop wouldn't boot past GRUB
    Inserted the NET-install-CD, booted from it, chose Installation and went on to the screed where the New Install/Ugrade choice is. There you also find "Repair installed system". Did that, GRUB was reconfigured and installed, DONE. Runs like a charm now.
    ° Appreciate my reply? Click the star and let me know why.

    ° Perfection is not gonna happen. No way.

    http://en.opensuse.org/User:Knurpht
    http://nl.opensuse.org/Gebruiker:Knurpht

  6. #6

    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    Knurpht wrote:

    >
    > I must say, logging in as root on a desktop environment? Don't ever.
    >
    > Since M6 messed up my GRUB as well, here's the simple solution:
    >
    > Found out GRUB was messed up in a way that laptop wouldn't boot past
    > GRUB
    > Inserted the NET-install-CD, booted from it, chose Installation and
    > went on to the screed where the New Install/Ugrade choice is. There you
    > also find "Repair installed system". Did that, GRUB was reconfigured and
    > installed, DONE. Runs like a charm now.
    >
    >


    I've tried that solution with every release on half-a-dozen machines or so
    since SuSE 7 and it has never worked. Come to think of it, it may have sort
    of worked this time by allowing boot of the problem system. Trouble is, the
    other [working] systems were no longer in the menu so I didn't consider it
    as being a viable solution.

    I've also logged on as Root since version 7 and never done anything stupid
    enough to damage the system. Since the warning wallpaper has been removed,
    I've gotten into the habit of setting it to bright red to remind me where I
    am.

    --
    Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks., UK. E-mail: newsman not newsboy
    "I wear the cheese. It does not wear me."

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    I don't. Reasons are obvious. If I have to run some program with rootpermissions, I use 'kdesu command' or 'su -c command'.
    ° Appreciate my reply? Click the star and let me know why.

    ° Perfection is not gonna happen. No way.

    http://en.opensuse.org/User:Knurpht
    http://nl.opensuse.org/Gebruiker:Knurpht

  8. #8

    Default Re: How I updated M6 without losing it.

    Knurpht wrote:

    >
    > I don't. Reasons are obvious. If I have to run some program with
    > rootpermissions, I use 'kdesu command' or 'su -c command'.
    >


    I suppose I could have stayed in my home session and used Dolphin in super-
    user mode to rename the files, neglected to close it, and then done
    something silly in that panel a few days later, having forgotten what it
    was. Yes, that would work.


    --
    Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks., UK. E-mail: newsman not newsboy
    "I wear the cheese. It does not wear me."

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