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Thread: Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

  1. #1
    dr83 NNTP User

    Default Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

    hello recently i've tried to setup tomcat in suse but it turn out to be very difficult.
    I do know that after I've unziped tomcat i need to tell the tomcat where the JRE has been installed.
    in some forums it turned out that I shoul access mine .bashrc file but the "gedit ~/.bashrc" didnt worked and i didnt know where to find this file the only file that i found is bash.bashrc situated into mine /etc.

    I dont know if this is the file that i need to change at end by typing "export JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/jre1.6.0_16".

    thanks in advance for the help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    ukraine/mk/pervomaysk
    Posts
    528

    Default Re: Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

    dr83 wrote:

    > hello recently i've tried to setup tomcat in suse but it turn out to be
    > very difficult.
    > I do know that after I've unziped tomcat i need to tell the tomcat
    > where the JRE has been installed.
    > in some forums it turned out that I shoul access mine .bashrc file but
    > the "gedit ~/.bashrc" didnt worked and i didnt know where to find this
    > file the only file that i found is bash.bashrc situated into mine /etc.


    i did not know anything about tomcat
    but ~/.bashrc in opensuse have this location

    Code:
    ~>ls ~/.bashrc
    /home/user/.bashrc
    this is mine one wo my stuff

    Code:
    # Sample .bashrc for SuSE Linux
    # Copyright (c) SuSE GmbH Nuernberg
    
    # There are 3 different types of shells in bash: the login shell, normal
    shell
    # and interactive shell. Login shells read ~/.profile and interactive shells
    # read ~/.bashrc; in our setup, /etc/profile sources ~/.bashrc - thus all
    # settings made here will also take effect in a login shell.
    #
    # NOTE: It is recommended to make language settings in ~/.profile rather
    than
    # here, since multilingual X sessions would not work properly if LANG is
    over-
    # ridden in every subshell.
    
    # Some applications read the EDITOR variable to determine your favourite
    text
    # editor. So uncomment the line below and enter the editor of your choice
    :-)
    #export EDITOR=/usr/bin/vim
    #export EDITOR=/usr/bin/mcedit
    
    # For some news readers it makes sense to specify the NEWSSERVER variable
    here
    #export NEWSSERVER=your.news.server
    
    # If you want to use a Palm device with Linux, uncomment the two lines
    below.
    # For some (older) Palm Pilots, you might need to set a lower baud rate
    # e.g. 57600 or 38400; lowest is 9600 (very slow!)
    #
    #export PILOTPORT=/dev/pilot
    #export PILOTRATE=115200

    so you could create new one
    Code:
    ~>touch ~/.bashrc
    and edit it with your favorite editor then restart bash, thats all
    --
    WBR

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    West Yorkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,454

    Default Re: Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

    Locate gives me:

    /etc/bash.bashrc
    /etc/skel/.bashrc
    plus one in each user's /home

  4. #4
    goldie NNTP User

    Default Re: Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

    strange, very strange....i copy and pasted your "gedit ~/.bashrc"
    (without the quotes) into an Alt+F2 pop up and it worked here, perfectly..

    i wonder if you are signed into KDE (or whatever) as root??

    and, what operating system are you using? is it openSUSE or SUSE
    Enterprise Linux Desktop or Server (aka: SLED or SLES)

    my java home is: JAVA_HOME="/usr/lib/jvm/java so i wonder where you
    got, and how you installed your java??

    not to mention: WHY are you unzipping tomcat?? unzipping is NOT
    involved in installing tomcat!!!!!!

    oh, i look at your profile and i see you just joined these fora ten
    days ago and have only made three posts....WELCOME...but, i wonder if
    you are trying to install stuff using normal Windows[tm] or Mac[tm]
    procedures? if so, you need to *STOP*, you are shooting yourself in
    the head, never mind the foot....and machine over and over..

    read carefully:

    http://en.opensuse.org/Concepts
    http://www.novell.com/documentation/...0_startup.html
    http://tinyurl.com/6jwtg9

    i can't be sure which one is most important to BEGIN with...but, i
    guess you need to read HOW to install software in "Concepts"...before
    you have to reinstall to correct all the tangled wires you may have
    introduced...

    a little reading will save you lots of wheel spinning time...

    --
    goldie

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Groningen, Netherlands
    Posts
    20,037
    Blog Entries
    14

    Default Re: Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

    John is right. Since you don't find one, it can only be, that you're issuing 'gedit ~/.bashrc' as root....

    Normally on openSUSE you would configure your JRE with the command:

    su -c 'update-alternatives --config java'
    This will ask for the rootpassword and then give you the choice of installed JRE's.

    Hope this helps you any further
    ° Appreciate my reply? Click the star and let me know why.

    ° Perfection is not gonna happen. No way.

    https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Board#Members
    http://en.opensuse.org/User:Knurpht
    http://nl.opensuse.org/Gebruiker:Knurpht

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    ukraine/mk/pervomaysk
    Posts
    528

    Default Re: Where is .bashrc in suse 11.1

    goldie wrote:

    > strange, very strange....i copy and pasted your "gedit ~/.bashrc"
    > (without the quotes) into an Alt+F2 pop up and it worked here, perfectly.

    it is possible that OP ha no gedit installed in system, for example if he
    use KDE
    if so you can try "kate ~/.bashrc" insted of gedit
    but if you open any terminal and type there
    Code:
    cat ~/.bashrc
    you will see for sure, have you this file or not.
    and then will be next questions
    --
    WBR

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