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Thread: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

  1. #1
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    Default Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    Which IDE do you use for Linux development? About once every six months, I'll do a Web search on this to see what people are using. Seems like KDevelop (of course), Eclipse and the redoutable Emacs remain the environments of choice.

    I came up in assembly on micros, then DOS, and then Windows. The first time I ever tried Microsoft's Visual Studio under Windows 95/98, I was absolutely hooked. Not only does it generate the application framework for you, the resources editor (i.e., where you design and build the dialogs, buttons and other eye candy) is 100%, totally integrated into the source editor.

    For those who've never used it (and apparently, many of the people making comparisons between even Glade -- which I'll admit, is nice and comes close -- obviously haven't):

    1. I want to add a dialog to my application. I use a drag-and-drop editor to make look exactly as I wish, then Visual Studio automatically adds it to the application. I don't have to do anything else except "call" it when I want it to appear. It's all done for me.

    2. I want to add a button to this dialog. I drag and drop a new button, make it look like I want, and then right-click for the Class Wizard. I can then see all messages/events that might be generated by that control, choose one of them, and Visual Studio will automatically generate the handling function for me, making all "connections" between the button and the rest of the code. All I have to do is poke in my application-specific code. The framework is automatically generated with do-nothing handlers.

    That last part is the key. Nothing I've seen for Linux can do this (some of them, like Glade, come close, but still require a lot more work). In my job, programming is a secondary function. I don't have weeks to tweak and get something right.

    Ergo, my fellow Linux Lovers: if you want to know why things like Visual Basic, Visual C++ (which I use) and other Microsoft tools continue to dominate (and thus, Windows), there's one good reason why: I can sit down with Visual Studio and knock out a call screening program for our talk studios in a single weekend. This isn't just eye candy, either -- it "talks" to the telephone system, can tell if a call is ringing in, on hold, or on air, etc., etc ... and even allows instant messaging between the show host and the board operators in the control room.

    In one weekend. Not even a hard weekend, either.

    Is anything like this available for Linux? I would DEARLY love to move our remaining stuff from Windows over to F/OSS, but this prevents me: I have to write this stuff and Visual Studio makes it quicker and easier.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    Quote Originally Posted by smpoole7
    Which IDE do you use for Linux development? About once every six months,
    I'll do a Web search on this to see what people are using. Seems like
    KDevelop (of course), Eclipse and the redoutable Emacs remain the
    environments of choice.

    I came up in assembly on micros, then DOS, and then Windows. The first
    time I ever tried Microsoft's Visual Studio under Windows 95/98, I was
    absolutely hooked. Not only does it generate the application framework
    for you, the resources editor (i.e., where you design and build the
    dialogs, buttons and other eye candy) is 100%, totally integrated into
    the source editor.

    For those who've never used it (and apparently, many of the people
    making comparisons between even Glade -- which I'll admit, is nice and
    comes close -- obviously haven't):

    1. I want to add a dialog to my application. I use a drag-and-drop
    editor to make look exactly as I wish, then Visual Studio automatically
    adds it to the application. I don't have to do anything else except
    "call" it when I want it to appear. It's all done for me.

    2. I want to add a button to this dialog. I drag and drop a new button,
    make it look like I want, and then right-click for the Class Wizard. I
    can then see all messages/events that might be generated by that
    control, choose one of them, -and Visual Studio will automatically
    generate the handling function for me, making all "connections" between
    the button and the rest of the code.- All I have to do is poke in my
    application-specific code. The framework is automatically generated with
    do-nothing handlers.

    That last part is the key. Nothing I've seen for Linux can do this
    (some of them, like Glade, come close, but still require a lot more
    work). In my job, programming is a secondary function. I don't have
    weeks to tweak and get something right.

    Ergo, my fellow Linux Lovers: if you want to know why things like
    Visual Basic, Visual C++ (which I use) and other Microsoft tools
    continue to dominate (and thus, Windows), there's one good reason why: I
    can sit down with Visual Studio and knock out a call screening program
    for our talk studios in a single weekend. This isn't just eye candy,
    either -- it "talks" to the telephone system, can tell if a call is
    ringing in, on hold, or on air, etc., etc ... and even allows instant
    messaging between the show host and the board operators in the control
    room.

    In one weekend. Not even a hard weekend, either.

    Is anything like this available for Linux? I would DEARLY love to move
    our remaining stuff from Windows over to F/OSS, but this prevents me: I
    have to write this stuff and Visual Studio makes it quicker and easier.
    Hi
    Codeblocks...? http://www.codeblocks.org/ It's in the repositories.

    --
    Cheers Malcolm (Linux Counter #276890)
    openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 5 (i586) Kernel 2.6.31-rc4-1-desktop
    up 18:59, 2 users, load average: 0.03, 0.12, 0.18
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmlewis View Post
    Hi
    Codeblocks...? Code::Blocks It's in the repositories.
    I gave that one a hard look. The editor looks great and it will integrate with all of the build tools, but GUI creation is still pretty much cut-and-try. That's exactly what I'm trying to get away from.

    My theory is, every GUI application will need a main window, perhaps a main frame, several dialogs and other standard features. The time I spend on that is basically wasted time and is duplicated effort, something I essentially have to repeat (or at least heavily tweak) for each application.

    If there's anyone here who has actually tried Visual Studio, they know what I'm talking about. Drag and drop, and the framework automatically inserts the needed code to support your new control. When you're editing, you can click on a control in a dialog box and it will automatically take you to the code that supports it. And so on, and so on.

    (The common complaint is that this "hides" everything from the programmer. You still get complete C++ source files and can edit them manually if you like.)

    -- Stephen

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    Quote Originally Posted by smpoole7
    malcolmlewis;2023991 Wrote:
    > Hi
    > Codeblocks...? 'Code::Blocks' (http://www.codeblocks.org/) It's in the
    > repositories.


    I gave that one a hard look. The editor looks great and it will
    integrate with all of the build tools, but GUI creation is still pretty
    much cut-and-try. That's exactly what I'm trying to get away from.

    My theory is, every GUI application will need a main window, perhaps a
    main frame, several dialogs and other standard features. The time I
    spend on that is basically wasted time and is duplicated effort,
    something I essentially have to repeat (or at least heavily tweak) for
    each application.

    If there's anyone here who has actually tried Visual Studio, they know
    what I'm talking about. Drag and drop, and the framework automatically
    inserts the needed code to support your new control. When you're
    editing, you can click on a control in a dialog box and it will
    automatically take you to the code that supports it. And so on, and so
    on.

    (The common complaint is that this "hides" everything from the
    programmer. You still get complete C++ source files and can edit them
    manually if you like.)

    -- Stephen
    Hi Stephen
    I'm a bit confused on that.... (but that's easy done, I'm not a c++
    coder and never used VS but have used VB) But if you use WXsmith, this
    creates Frame, dialogs etc?? I would imagine in VS you have created
    something like a standard project you use, so this sort of thing in
    codeblocks wouldn't meet your requirements?

    --
    Cheers Malcolm (Linux Counter #276890)
    openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 5 (i586) Kernel 2.6.31-rc4-1-desktop
    up 1 day 1:45, 2 users, load average: 0.00, 0.08, 0.11
    ASUS eeePC 1000HE ATOM N280 1.66GHz | GPU Mobile 945GM/GMS/GME


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmlewis View Post
    Hi Stephen
    I'm a bit confused on that.... (but that's easy done, I'm not a c++
    coder and never used VS but have used VB) But if you use WXsmith, this
    creates Frame, dialogs etc?? I would imagine in VS you have created
    something like a standard project you use, so this sort of thing in
    codeblocks wouldn't meet your requirements?
    Heh. I went to your link and looked at it again. I just came back in here to post this very thing. I hadn't noticed the WXsmith plugin before.

    I believe that will do EXACTLY what I want. Better yet, WXWindows is cross-platform. If I'm going to invest the time and energy in learning a new system, I want it to be as applicable as possible.

    Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    Quote Originally Posted by smpoole7
    malcolmlewis;2024097 Wrote:
    > Hi Stephen
    > I'm a bit confused on that.... (but that's easy done, I'm not a c++
    > coder and never used VS but have used VB) But if you use WXsmith, this
    > creates Frame, dialogs etc?? I would imagine in VS you have created
    > something like a standard project you use, so this sort of thing in
    > codeblocks wouldn't meet your requirements?


    Heh. I went to your link and looked at it again. I just came back in
    here to post this very thing. I hadn't noticed the WXsmith plugin
    before.

    I believe that will do EXACTLY what I want. Better yet, WXWindows is
    cross-platform. If I'm going to invest the time and energy in learning a
    new system, I want it to be as applicable as possible.

    Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Hi
    Your welcome I have had a play around with it, need to get some new
    skills hence the reason for using it.... It's in the devel:toos:ide
    repository.

    --
    Cheers Malcolm (Linux Counter #276890)
    openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 5 (i586) Kernel 2.6.31-rc4-1-desktop
    up 1 day 2:44, 2 users, load average: 0.08, 0.07, 0.02
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  7. #7
    R.F. Pels NNTP User

    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    smpoole7 wrote:

    > Which IDE do you use for Linux development? About once every six months,
    > I'll do a Web search on this to see what people are using. Seems like
    > KDevelop (of course), Eclipse and the redoutable Emacs remain the
    > environments of choice.


    QtCreator is worth mentioning and - as far as I know - cross platform (IDE
    runs on all platforms supported by QT4.

    --
    Ruurd

  8. #8
    R.F. Pels NNTP User

    Default Re: Repeating The Age-Old Question: Which IDE?

    smpoole7 wrote:

    > I believe that will do EXACTLY what I want. Better yet, WXWindows is
    > cross-platform. If I'm going to invest the time and energy in learning a
    > new system, I want it to be as applicable as possible.


    Yeah. Not to mention the fact that it looks horrible.

    --
    Ruurd

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