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Thread: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

  1. #1

    Angry SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    I just installed OpenSuse 11.1 followed by Linux Mint 7. The latter produced a boot loader for all 8 operating systems on my system. All worked including SUSE. I just ran all the updates on SUSE, but immediately after reboot the loader failed to reboot SUSE. Obviously, I can no longer get into SUSE. The message was, "file not found." Is there any solution to this dilemma short of a re-installation of SUSE. Any comments would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    Quote Originally Posted by archp2008 View Post
    I just installed OpenSuse 11.1 followed by Linux Mint 7. The latter produced a boot loader for all 8 operating systems on my system. All worked including SUSE. I just ran all the updates on SUSE, but immediately after reboot the loader failed to reboot SUSE. Obviously, I can no longer get into SUSE. The message was, "file not found." Is there any solution to this dilemma short of a re-installation of SUSE. Any comments would be much appreciated.
    Its unlikely I can help, but I do have a suspicion as to the problem. It reads to me that the grub boot manager setup by Mint 7 calls your openSUSE boot in such a way that openSUSE does not boot.

    Speculating (and unfortunately this is only speculation on my part) its possible your Mint 7 calls your openSUSE with something like:

    Code:
    title openSUSE 11.1 - 2.6.27.23-0.1
        root (hd0,3)
        kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.27.23-0.1-default root=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST31500341AS_9VS14DG6-part2 resume=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST31500341AS_9VS14DG6-part3 splash=silent showopts vga=0x346
        initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.27.23-0.1-default
    But you probably now have instead vmlinuz-2.6.27.25-0.1-default instead of vmlinuz-2.6.27.23-0.1-default and you probably now have instead initrd-2.6.27.25-0.1-default instead of initrd-2.6.27.23-0.1-default.

    ie I am guessing (and I do not know for certain) that your Mint may be calling specific files in openSUSE?

    Alternatively, if you had generic calls for vmlinux and initrd, it might work ... ? :
    Code:
    title openSUSE 11.1
        root (hd0,3)
        kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST31500341AS_9VS14DG6-part2    resume=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST31500341AS_9VS14DG6-part3 splash=silent showopts vga=0x346
        initrd /boot/initrd
    Note I am speculating rather wildly here. ... One need to post your /boot/grub/menu.lst files from both Mint and openSUSE.

    And again, someone more skilled than I needs to answer this. Hopefully my ideas to consider don't waste your time.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    oldcpu is probably on the money. Normally a kernel upgrade on SUSE will update its menu.lst as part of the process. However as you are using a different bootloader, it didn't update the Mint menu.lst so that was left referring to an older kernel version which would have been deleted by the upgrade.

    Is there any way you can run the Mint bootloader setup to redetect the SUSE partition? Or if you know what to change in menu.lst you can follow oldcpu's suggestion.

    In future you could install SUSE's bootloader in the partition MBR and have Mint's bootloader chain to that.

  4. #4

    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    Thanks for the replies. If a kernel upgrade on any given version of Linux only updates its own menu.lst, how can I ever hope to maintain a single bootloader for all my Linux distros? I don't know if there is any way I can run the Mint bootloader setup to redetect the SUSE partition? I was hoping this procedure would have been fairly similar in all Linux distros and someone on this forum would know that. Is there a way, for example, to run the SUSE bootloader setup to detect other operating systems (i.e. without a full re-installation)? When I installed SUSE the first time, I made the mistake of leaving all drives disconnected except the one on which I was installing SUSE. I didn't fully trust either distro not to block access to my existing Operating Systems, and access to WinXP was most critical. I was delighted, though, when Mint detected everything, including SUSE. This only change after updating. The bootloader was saved to that single drive but quickly ceased to open on that drive for no apparent reason. I would just go straight into the Windows on that drive. It wouldn't have booted SUSE after reconnecting the drives anyway, unless I kept disconnected my drive cables each time I wanted to load SUSE. If there is no solution but to completely reinstall SUSE and overwrite the Mint bootloader, I intend to make a copy of the present menu.1st on a floppy so that I can copy any needed portions from the Mint bootloader to the new bootloader that hopefully will be generated by SUSE. If I don't receive any further replies on this topic, I will assume that reinstalling SUSE with all drives connected is my only recourse. Thanks again.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    No, all is not lost!
    All you have to do is to either use the suse install disc and select the recover option, or boot to any of the other linux distros and use its equivalent of opensuse's boot loader options to recover your opensuse installation. This will automate the recovery.

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    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    No, nothing so drastic required. All that is needed is probably just a edit of a couple of lines in Mint's menu.lst. Just bring up a text editor and edit it in Mint. Much faster than a total reinstall for sure.

    There is another way to avoid the problem in future. openSUSE maintains a couple of symlinks in /boot, vmlinuz points to the current kernel and initrd points to the corresponding initrd. If you edit menu.lst to use those names instead of the versioned filenames, it should stay up to date with openSUSE updates.

  7. #7

    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    Thanks for the further clarification.
    Here is the part for SUSE:
    # This entry automatically added by the Debian installer for an existing
    # linux installation on /dev/sdb6.
    title openSUSE 11.1 (on /dev/sdb6)
    root (hd1,5)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.27.7-9-default root=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD10EADS-00L5B1_WD-WCAU48401505-part6 resume=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD10EADS-00L5B1_WD-WCAU48401505-part5 splash=silent showopts vga=0x317
    initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.27.7-9-default
    savedefault
    boot

    Do I need to edit the vmlinuz part? How to I ascertain what it should be changed to?

    Regarding the Suse install disc and the recover option, specifically how do I access that option? It is the 11.1 64-bit KDE 4 Live CD that I have. What specifically does the SUSE recover option do? Does it create a new menu.lst or update the existing Mint menu.lst? If so, will it copy to the same location as my present bootloader?

    It seems that there are two options here. Which is the simpler one?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    Change this:

    Code:
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.27.7-9-default root=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD10EADS-00L5B1_WD-WCAU48401505-part6 resume=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD10EADS-00L5B1_WD-WCAU48401505-part5 splash=silent showopts vga=0x317
    initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.27.7-9-default
    To this:

    Code:
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD10EADS-00L5B1_WD-WCAU48401505-part6 resume=/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD10EADS-00L5B1_WD-WCAU48401505-part5 splash=silent showopts vga=0x317
    initrd /boot/initrd
    That should get you going and should be future-proof against kernel updates, provided the symlinks are there.

    I would not recommend using the openSUSE Repair option at this point, as it doesn't have a complete menu.lst, unlike Mint.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    FWIW here is a more general and a lasting solution. It's based on the fact that there exists in /boot symlinks to the real vmlinuz and the real initrd. These symlinks are automagically upgraded each time the kernel gets upgraded. So all you need is for the entry in Mint t point to the symlinks in Suse and it will stay forever current. I have a machine with that in place on the Ubuntu loader because I've stayed with the Ubuntu grub. It looks like this:
    Code:
    # Swerdna's entry to boot the openSUSE installation on /dev/sda5 by symlinks
    title openSUSE 11.1 (on /dev/sda5) by symlinks
    root (hd0,4)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda5
    initrd /boot/initrd
    boot
    Works like a charm and doesn't need updating when Suse changes.

    Reference: HowTo Multiboot openSUSE from Ubuntu using the GRUB bootloader
    Leap 42.3 & 15.1 &KDE
    FYIs from the days of yore

  10. #10

    Smile Re: SUSE knocked out by upgrades

    It works! Great! Thanks so much. How did you figure out that? I'm into SUSE now! Could I ask you about a second issue. I get a message in the top right of my screen at startup about not supporting some aspect of my audio and falling back to default. Is that a concern? I have integrated Audio. There is a SoundMax ADI1988 Audio Linux Driver V1.0.11 for my MOBO for kernel 2.4 and 2.6 at the Asus site but I have no idea how to install it or if I should.

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