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Thread: creating Suse Installation partition

  1. #1

    Default creating Suse Installation partition

    Hi guyz,

    Im installing opensuse 11.0 on my Toshiba Satellite. Can i make an empty partition at runtime or do I need to create a partition in Windows first, then proceed with the Suse installation. I would prefer doing it while installation.
    (Amazingly the partitions it shows during installations shows my 40GB partition as 20GB, and the NTFS file system to be ext3 systems??

    Shall I trust it that it wont bother my windows installations, as i want to keep them and can I create a new partition during installation???


    Xizzling

  2. #2

    Default Re: creating Suse Installation partition

    Yes, you can create partitions during install - leaving the space unallocated is fine. It shouldn't touch Windows unless you tell it to, though obviously you may well want to put grub in place of the Windows bootloader. If it's Vista, read the multiboot sticky at the top of the forum, if it's XP then I've personally never had problems with it.

    You are aware that 11.1 is the current stable release...?

    (not that there's anything wrong with choosing an older version for stability or compatibility... it's just that RPM based distros aren't famed for their ability to 'distro upgrade')

  3. #3

    Default Re: creating Suse Installation partition

    Actually i thought i would upgrade it later to 11.1, once i install 11.0, since i am short on bland disks. Whats an RPM distro?

    Yes I have an XP installed.


    Xizz

  4. #4
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    Default Re: creating Suse Installation partition

    openSUSE is an RPM distro in the sense that software is distributed in RPM as opposed to .deb packages.

  5. #5

    Default Re: creating Suse Installation partition

    Ok, that's no problem - but you need to know that you may find it won't work upgrading from 11.0 to 11.1 on a running system. It isn't impossible, just troublesome.

    The suggested way to do it is to burn a new disc (or USB image, or ISO on hard drive...) and install over the top, rather than upgrading - and for this reason it might well be worth just getting a copy of 11.1 now.

    If you make your home partition separate, it's less painful to reinstall afterwards, because you can simply not format home and keep all your files and settings...

  6. #6

    Default Re: creating Suse Installation partition

    Ok thank you so much for the help. Seems that i have a lot to learn in this suse/linux world

    I have installed 11.0 but will later make a new cd to install 11.1.
    Thanks

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