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Thread: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

  1. #1
    5huhulalu NNTP User

    Default Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    Hi, I would like to get rid of the "insert password" window when I run yast2.
    I searched few forums, tried few "solutions" (yast2 sudo tool, visudo), but i was not successful. The "insert pasword" always pops up when I first start yast2. The only result of these attempts was that my xserver collapsed. So I reinstalled Opensuse and decided to ask for help here.

    Please: is there an easy way how to handle (preferably through GUI) privileges and capabilities in opensuse? I find yast2-sudo tool very user unfriendly.

    Thank you

    V.

    I am a newbie (so far) willing to learn. Opensuse 11.1 64-bit, KDE 4.2, fresh installation...

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    What is it you really want to do? Avoid typing in the password every time you need to use YaST? Just enter the password the first time, then leave the top-level window around, minimised when you don't want to see it, for the rest of the session. No problem!

  3. #3
    5huhulalu NNTP User

    Default Re: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    Thanks for reply. I want to avoid typing in the password even for the first run of yast2.

    And I want to know whether there is some more user friendly configuration tool than visudo or yast2-sudo configuration tool.

  4. #4
    5huhulalu NNTP User

    Default Re: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    Moreover, even when yast2 is running, I still need to type the pasword whenever yast2 runs with some options (typically: /sbin/yast2 OneClickInstallWorker).

    So I want to force yast2 (all the modules, all options of that command) not to ask for a password.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    It is a not good solution you're looking for, almost as mad as running the OS as root. You can run as root and You won't have to type in the password. If i'm not wrong you could set a PolicyKit rule to be able to run YaST without a password. It is a security feature not to annoy You, deal with that and You will be happy and at least more secure. Besides, when you type the password it lasts for couple of minutes anyway.
    How does a linux geek make love??

    - rtfm; unzip; strip; touch; finger; mount; fsck; more; yes; umount; zip; sleep;

  6. #6
    5huhulalu NNTP User

    Default Re: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    I know there is always a trade-off between comfort and security. But some people value comfort and others security. I think that an informed user should be able to switch one for another once he is aware of all potential risks going with it. It is all about individual preferences. I do not want to tun the os as root. but I simply do not want to be as secure as you are when i am just playing with Opensuse on my notebook and configuring it with yast2 (and not with some more dangerous command line tool).

    And I have decided to have a bit more comfort and a bit less security. At least now when I configure the system, the password prompts are quite anoying for me. Later on, when everything is running smoothly, all apps are installed, I will switch to normal security mode.
    But right know I would really like to run at least some yast2 modules (software update, network configuration etc.) without security prompts.

    Moreover: my question is wider. I have some apps that are not that dangerous (btnx, kvpnc...) and I want to run them as root without password prompts. But yast2-sudo and visudo are really clumsy and user unfriendly (especially yast2-sudo with all those aliases etc.). So I want to know whether there is some friendlier tool to configure priviledges than that clumsy sudo module in yast2.

    Thanks.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Yast2 without password (Sudo configuration)

    To answer your question, i am not 100% sure but PolicyKit is the way to go to set this up?
    You'd have to read the manual to find this out but i think this is possible to make, you just need to create your own PolicyKit rules?
    How does a linux geek make love??

    - rtfm; unzip; strip; touch; finger; mount; fsck; more; yes; umount; zip; sleep;

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