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Thread: how to resolve /root disk space full

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    N. Wales
    Posts
    1,028

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    JosephKK adjusted his/her AFDB on Sunday 02 Aug 2009 05:08 to write:

    >>Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    >>5. df -h :
    >>Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    >>/dev/sda4 20G 18G 1.2G 95% /
    >>udev 2.9G 120K 2.9G 1% /dev
    >>/dev/sda10 144G 224M 136G 1% /backup
    >>/dev/sda9 143G 4.1G 132G 3% /data
    >>/dev/sda8 20G 175M 19G 1% /home
    >>/dev/sda5 9.9G 151M 9.2G 2% /tmp
    >>/dev/sda6 20G 3.5G 16G 19% /usr
    >>/dev/sda7 9.9G 2.4G 7.1G 25% /var
    >>/dev/hda1 111G 12G 93G 12% /backup2
    >>
    >>Thanks

    >
    > Something is wrong, suse 10.2 should not use over 9 or 10 GB in "/"
    > with that directory / mount tree. Check for space wasters again.


    Maybe a bit off target here but IIRC did the 10 series use /opt for a load
    of stuff? ( or was that even earlier? )


    Also have you got any old kernel modules hanging around in /libs

    --
    Mark
    Caveat emptor
    Nullus in verba
    Nil illegitimi carborundum

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta, Beijing
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    Hi,
    pls do this as root user:
    Code:
    cd /
    du --exclude=./dev --exclude=./backup --exclude=./data --exclude=./home --exclude=./tmp --exclude=./usr --exclude=./var --exclude=./backup2 | sort -n
    it will show you what is taking up your / space

    HTH
    "And just as you want men to do to you, you also do to them likewise."
    Luke 6:31 NKJV

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    74

    Unhappy Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    Hi,

    I've got a similar problem. My harddisk is only 60GB. I have a dual-boot system with openSUSE 11.1 and Windows XP. I want to resize the partitions to allocate more space for Linux (I've pretty much moved to Linux completely).

    The other problem is I've used up 6.6 GB (93%) of my /. I've read that this is too large. I did check the /tmp and /var/log directories (/tmp was about 640MB and /var/log/ was about 40MB).

    Here are my df -h and fdisk -l results respectively.
    Code:
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda6             7.5G  6.6G  518M  93% /
    udev                  999M  104K  999M   1% /dev
    /dev/sda7              11G  1.2G  8.6G  12% /home
    /dev/sda1              36G   25G   12G  68% /windows/C
    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 60.0 GB, 60011642880 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7296 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xd0f4738c
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1               1        4684    37624198+   7  HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda2   *        4685        7295    20972857+   f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5            4685        4946     2104483+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda6            4947        5936     7952143+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda7            5937        7295    10916136   83  Linux
    Thanks.

  4. #14

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    ran the du , piped the results to a text file , as there is to much to show.

    How do I attach a text file here?

    Thanks

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta, Beijing
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    Hi,
    it seems that file attachment is disabled in this forum,
    maybe you can use pastebin.com
    "And just as you want men to do to you, you also do to them likewise."
    Luke 6:31 NKJV

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    Just another newbie question.

    I'm still baffled as to why my root directory 6G. Is it because I've been installing programs on root?

    When I've been compiling programs from source I don't specify a directory so presumably they are installed on the default directories? (perhaps /usr/bin). Would this fill up the root directory?

    I remember once when I had 350 MB left on the root and tried to install a new program that was 400 MB it said that I didn't have sufficient storage space or something, even though I had 7G on my home directory.

    Thanks.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    N. Wales
    Posts
    1,028

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    lostidentity adjusted his/her AFDB on Saturday 15 Aug 2009 16:26 to write:

    >
    > Just another newbie question.
    >
    > I'm still baffled as to why my root directory 6G. Is it because I've
    > been installing programs on root?
    >
    > When I've been compiling programs from source I don't specify a
    > directory so presumably they are installed on the default directories?
    > (perhaps /usr/bin). Would this fill up the root directory?
    >
    > I remember once when I had 350 MB left on the root and tried to install
    > a new program that was 400 MB it said that I didn't have sufficient
    > storage space or something, even though I had 7G on my home directory.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >


    Most self complied programs when installed will have a specific directory
    for the destination written in the config file which can be overridden with
    parameters passed when you compile them, the "normal" defaults are either
    /usr/bin if it is just a one off binary also it might plant a man page or it
    might also have some stuff in /usr/share, however some other programs (
    older ones or from other distros can put themselves in /usr/local )

    There could also be some around who put themselves in /opt/ if you look kde3
    and gnome put themselves there, this is slowly being phased out now IIRC and
    just the odd one or 2 things still use it.

    If however you are installing root/system specific files that are needed
    even if he machine can only boot to say runlevel 1 where a minimal system is
    brought up for maintenance or repair then these go in the actual / system,
    so if you have a smallish sized drive it is best policy to have partitions
    for /usr, /opt, /var, /tmp and /home on separate partitions so that the /
    does not suffer from a lack of space if you install too much or something
    runs amok and fills /var with humongous log files.

    There are a lot more things to take into consideration if you are disk
    space limited but that is a rough overview.

    It is possible to install things to your /home as long as you have the
    install dir set in your path, and also it is possible to have root commands
    there as long as these are in the system/root path, but this is where things
    start to get messy and can compromise security on systems and is not a
    recommended thing to do.

    If you have a permanent network and more than 1 machine in the local lan (
    can also be on a remote machine over the net ) it is possible to have your
    /home and other directories on other machines, now that does get fun, when
    all your docs are at home on a machine and you only have a / system on your
    laptop ( or even a bootable USB stick ), but this calls for a good, fast and
    reliable connection

    :-)

    There I think I have wittered on now for long enough, I do hope you are
    still awake :-)

    HTH

    --
    Mark
    Caveat emptor
    Nullus in verba
    Nil illegitimi carborundum

  8. #18
    goldie NNTP User

    Default Re: how to resolve /root disk space full

    lostidentity wrote:
    > Just another newbie question.
    >
    > I'm still baffled as to why my root directory 6G. Is it because I've
    > been installing programs on root?


    yes, generally speaking programs installed with go into the root
    directory (yes, /usr/bin, like /lib and ALL the others following / on
    that partition are inside the root directory)...

    in a different partition (if you wish, think of it as a different hard
    drive) is /home...under /home you can have hundreds of different
    users, like /home/lostidenity; /home/guest; /home/lostidentysFriend
    etc etc etc

    which mean, you could have a billion gigs of /home and your tiny root
    would still fill up if you keep putting more programs into it..

    as mentioned, there are ways to force installs to your home (easiest,
    i'd guess is to read the docs with the install sources before you
    compile/install)


    --
    goldie
    Give a hacker a fish and you feed him for a day.
    Teach man and you feed him for a lifetime.

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