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Thread: long term support

  1. #11
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    Default Re: long term support

    <cough>openSLES</cough>

  2. #12
    Zami2 NNTP User

    Question Re: long term support

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrysantine View Post
    <cough>openSLES</cough>
    Do you think a community version of SUSE Linux Enterprise would be easier to accomplish than an LTS OpenSUSE? I honestly don't know, but with new tools like OBS and SUSE Studio this might be the case. We would perhaps need to get rid of the brandings of SLES/D, but there would be a smaller amount of actual development (by the community) needed imho, because of Novell.

    I started a topic about this on the Suse Studio forums/mailing list, but didn't get much of a response so far.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: long term support

    Perhaps, perhaps not but it would surely increase the proliferation of SuSE in businesses.

    Let's face it - many smaller businesses aren't interested in paying for SLED/SLES for the sole reason that they are stupidly expensive.

    Having a free CentOS style distribution version would not only help acceptance but perhaps foster contributions and move more Windows based shops to Linux.

  4. #14

    Default Re: long term support

    Pricing depends a bit on your own perspective. It is not a typical Small Business Server, but more targetted on the larger enterprises. So for an OS that can handle over 4 CPU's and over 32GB of memory it is not that expensive at all.

  5. #15

    Default Re: long term support

    And if the new "zypper dup" is working as nicely as Debians "apt-get dist-upgrade" (only time and a lot of tests will tell), LTS is not really an issue any more.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: long term support

    Quote Originally Posted by joostvanrooij View Post
    And if the new "zypper dup" is working as nicely as Debians "apt-get dist-upgrade" (only time and a lot of tests will tell), LTS is not really an issue any more.
    Apples and oranges.

    The bottom idea behind an LTS version is to retain the SAME versions that were shipped and only backport security patches so vendors can certify their products against a certain distribution and version or upgrade them via a service pack - not mindlessly upgrading them via dup.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: long term support

    Every OS have few years of support that`s it then your are or everyone on there own.You can always switch to the next Version it is up to everyone.
    I don`t know if opensuse support may till 3 or 4 years I don`t know.Some of OS do 3-4 years of support.
    Motherboard MSI X58 Eclipse,320GB intern.HD,400GB Ext.HD,1.5TB intern.HD,6GB ram.Dual ViewSonic VX1962WM Monitor,Zip drive 250MB,HPpsc 2410 printer and Logitech G51 speakers

  8. #18
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    Default Re: long term support

    Quote Originally Posted by joostvanrooij View Post
    Pricing depends a bit on your own perspective. It is not a typical Small Business Server, but more targetted on the larger enterprises. So for an OS that can handle over 4 CPU's and over 32GB of memory it is not that expensive at all.
    No it is not expensive for few of us like me I can handle it Motherboard with over 30gb+ will be few $1000 of euro and you have to spend for very good system about $20.000 -30.000 Euro for larger enterprises.
    But the one is you have to build your own system then you know what you get from your own money,that is the KEY.
    Motherboard MSI X58 Eclipse,320GB intern.HD,400GB Ext.HD,1.5TB intern.HD,6GB ram.Dual ViewSonic VX1962WM Monitor,Zip drive 250MB,HPpsc 2410 printer and Logitech G51 speakers

  9. #19
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    Default Re: long term support

    When I started using Linux/GNU distributions, I found it exciting, and most of the software and desktops "Gnome, KDE" were fast. Everything is hype it seems now a days. Fedora pushing all new, "better" software. I really just want my install to work, and have the best software supported and installed on it. I don't want to go through a third party that doesn't have the resources to keep a system like this free from bugs, while keeping it secure. I liked KDE and used it for awhile. But one little thing that bothered me was that setting up the weather docklet was so complicated compared to gnomes. I couldn't understand why it had to be so difficult. I thought to myself "why can't they just rip off gnomes weather docklet?". So I ditched KDE. It really bothered me that KDE software had to suffer because it had to be K branded. Even if it's K branded, rip off the GTK counterpart. It's opensource, what's the problem? It really, really bothered me. So I used Gnome. And I enjoyed it. Until I started to get into the package managers. Spending hours reading online, Linux Format, Linux Journal, I found all this cool software, that seemed to be sometimes better than whatever branded desktop was using. So why can't these DE just eat up the code and ditch the ****? It's not really stopping me to install and keep up to date software that I find, and publications reccomend, but it's the ignorance that pisses me off. It's over zealous, like Stallman always mentioning the GNU/Linux, not Linux. Like somehow he's not getting enough attention. These DE are the same way.
    Anyways, I jumped on the debian band wagon because of apt. I missed the ease of YAST. Run a search on google, and bam, YAST4debian. Finally, someone see's the light. Well that light slowly dimmed into oblivion.
    Knoppix came out, with fantastic hardware detection, and made it easy for noobs, myself included, to setup a debian based distro. However, it wasn't designed to be a debian replacement. Now there was the Gentoo hype. YOPER came out with the first attempt at making linux work faster, and carried the newest features that were supposed to make linux great. Maybe even a MS Windows replacement. Sadly the effort that was made, by learning from Gentoo's install guide for tweaking and making your install blazing fast, and having YAST support, the original maintainer was doing most of the work himself. Couldn't keep up with the likes of Gentoo or Debian for carrying, and supporting through bug and security fixes. So back at Ubuntu, they had installer that was great. Everything seemed peachy, even though there was no YAST. With Miguel writing redcarpet, it seemed that SuSe was going to have simple installing of software like debian. It died, and now theres Fedora. They offered YUM, but it seemed at the time that people rather use Apt4rpm. Still, I wanted speed, and YOPER speed without the fuss. I wanted to be able to install something with speed that I could install and walk away from. My family and friends could be in awe, and enjoy the ease of configuring it with YAST. From Gentoo, and now Archs convention of rolling updates, it would seem that setting it and forgetting it would make it breezy. Well most of the big distro players support this, but it's utter ****. Not once have I had a happy experience with this. I ditched Ubuntu because I couldn't understand this. Take a working system, fill the users with hyped new features, then get them to update. If there was a blue screen in linux, it would be popping up all the time. So with all this hopping, VIDALINUX comes out. Takes Anaconda from redhat, slaps it on Gentoo, and weehaw lets party. But no, it was buggy as anything else, and you had to fork out money if you wanted to install precompiled packages. There was a forum, and everyone seemed to need help compiling the software with emerge.
    Listen. Out of all the players, OpenSuse is the only one that has the prerequisites to Checkmate everyone else. I know you guys went KDE and if that's what floats your boat then cool. But at least, try to get just one, that's all I ask, cause no ones done it. Get one release out, that has the packages available, the bugs fixed, the speed worked on, and the software that is the best, no matter what "race" you are. Keep it working. Don't compete with others, make them compete with you. At least don't be releasing new and "better" upgrades that are worse than the last release. Maybe use a crafted approach of gentoo, like emerde for Slackware. I'm done with these hobby distro's that have all the right things and none of the support. Maybe get ahold of VidaLinux and Yoper, and assimilate. They seem to be coming back online, but I'm not going to try and use them, I know it's just going to let me down. It's sad, very sad. All this culture and community, all wanting attention. Give the baby's their bottle. It's too upsetting to keep on going like this. Too much potential all pissed up wind.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: long term support

    I posted earlier in this thread and I still think an LTS version isn't necessarily a bad idea.

    I will say that with the advent of easy upgrading brought into the mix by 11.2 that it makes the dire need for something like that much less.

    One of the things I appreciate so much about Debian is being able to update easily via apt/synaptic. Opensuse joins that level of ease with this release.

    Mind you, this is desktops/workstations I am talking about. Servers is something else entirely.

    I only provide security updates to servers and functionality when needed. otherwise, servers are left to be until absolutely necessary to update/upgrade.

    In which case, SLES would be the better choice in terms of Novell products.

    Just my opinion,

    Big Bear
    I play with bees during the day and I play with computers when the bees won't come out. That's just my job, who has time for a hobby?

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