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Thread: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

  1. #1
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    Smile I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    Well I usualy just install nvidia driver how is come but many others told me get out of init5 and type init3.

    Please,please and I appreciate very much that some of you can help me out so that I can understand how it works.

    Mike

  2. #2
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    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    It's simple: The difference between level 3 and 5 is that 5 runs a GUI. Since you cannot install a new video driver while the GUI is running, you have to drop to level 3 to do that.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    Quote Originally Posted by ken_yap View Post
    It's simple: The difference between level 3 and 5 is that 5 runs a GUI. Since you cannot install a new video driver while the GUI is running, you have to drop to level 3 to do that.
    I appreciate for your answer,could you please be explain me how or give a picture.
    Hmm do I have to log out first?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    The Nvidia website has everything you need to get up and going.

    The second link down gives you a link to what you need to read first, before you download the driver.
    Nvidia Installer HOWTO for SUSE LINUX users

    Download the driver that pertains to your card
    Unix Drivers Portal Page

    This is a page for the Nvidia card I have in my very old box. (This is an example, you have to get the driver pertaining to your card)
    Linux Display Driver - x86

    It gives you step by step instructions on how to install the driver.

    To drop down to init 3, you use ctrl+alt+f1

    This will bring you to tty1. Login as root and type
    Code:
    init 3
    Then install the driver

    To get back to the GUI type
    Code:
    init 5
    Hope this helps!
    Laptop: Dell Inspiron E1505 | OpenSUSE 12.1/Windows Vista | KDE | Intel CPU T2050 1.6 GHz | Intel 945GM | 3.2GB RAM
    Box: OpenSUSE 12.1/Windows 7 | KDE | Intel Core 2 Quad 8300 2.5GHz/core | nVidia Geforce 9500GT 1GB| 4 GB RAM

  5. #5

    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    @1Michael1

    I think you should take a konsole but I don`t know which one,I let the expert tell you.

    Good luck

    SB

  6. #6

    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    It's just that there are some scripts connected with the execution of init 3 and 5. When running init 5 you got most services including graphic. You can tweak it in YaST in "System Services RUNLEVEL" to get the idea.
    How does a linux geek make love??

    - rtfm; unzip; strip; touch; finger; mount; fsck; more; yes; umount; zip; sleep;

  7. #7
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    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    Well, every Unix like operating system make use of what is called "runlevels". These are numbered from 0 to 6 (actually there are more, but these are the usual and documented ones). When you restart your computer you just tell your system to enter runlevel 6. When you shutdown the computer you simply tell the system to enter runlevel 0.
    Unix is a multiuser system, meaning that more than one users can be logged into the same system at the same time. By telling your linux box to enter runlevel 1 (by issuing init 1) you make your system to enter a special mode that is supposed to be used by your root account and only, and it is for maintenance purposes. This is the single user mode. To make it more clear to you, suppose that you need to clean-up your file system. In that case only the root user that runs the clean-up process must be logged in. Any other user must be forbidden to login, because that would launch processes that would create and manipulate files.
    Now, when your system enters runlevel 5, it enters a multiuser mode (many users can be logged in the same system) using a graphical environment. This is the runlevel your system enters when boot-up. If you enter runlevel 3, the system still provides the multiuser ability but without graphical environment. Only the terminals are available.
    You can see that if you enter just the number 3 in the kernel parameters to be passed on your GRUB screen. The result would be just a login prompt in a terminal after booting and no graphical environment or login screen. Then if you login as root, you can issue the command init 5 and then you will see the graphical environment (the graphical login screen).
    When you want to install a graphics driver, no graphical environment is allowed (imagine that is something like driving a car while you have your tires changed!...). So you have to enter runlevel 3 first. This will drop your graphical environment so it is better to logout from it first. If you press the keys CTRL+ALT+F1 your screen will turn to a terminal. Then you login as root and enter the command init 3. After that you can install your new graphics driver freely, without problems. When finish you can enter init 5 to launch the graphical environment again and test the new settings.
    I hope this made the init thing more clear to you.

  8. #8

    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    eliaschr, i must honestly admit that is one of the best explanations online i've ever seen!! Every newbie could understand that, if ever everything could be explained that way
    How does a linux geek make love??

    - rtfm; unzip; strip; touch; finger; mount; fsck; more; yes; umount; zip; sleep;

  9. #9
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    Smile Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    Quote Originally Posted by eliaschr View Post
    Well, every Unix like operating system make use of what is called "runlevels". These are numbered from 0 to 6 (actually there are more, but these are the usual and documented ones). When you restart your computer you just tell your system to enter runlevel 6. When you shutdown the computer you simply tell the system to enter runlevel 0.
    Unix is a multiuser system, meaning that more than one users can be logged into the same system at the same time. By telling your linux box to enter runlevel 1 (by issuing init 1) you make your system to enter a special mode that is supposed to be used by your root account and only, and it is for maintenance purposes. This is the single user mode. To make it more clear to you, suppose that you need to clean-up your file system. In that case only the root user that runs the clean-up process must be logged in. Any other user must be forbidden to login, because that would launch processes that would create and manipulate files.
    Now, when your system enters runlevel 5, it enters a multiuser mode (many users can be logged in the same system) using a graphical environment. This is the runlevel your system enters when boot-up. If you enter runlevel 3, the system still provides the multiuser ability but without graphical environment. Only the terminals are available.
    You can see that if you enter just the number 3 in the kernel parameters to be passed on your GRUB screen. The result would be just a login prompt in a terminal after booting and no graphical environment or login screen. Then if you login as root, you can issue the command init 5 and then you will see the graphical environment (the graphical login screen).
    When you want to install a graphics driver, no graphical environment is allowed (imagine that is something like driving a car while you have your tires changed!...). So you have to enter runlevel 3 first. This will drop your graphical environment so it is better to logout from it first. If you press the keys CTRL+ALT+F1 your screen will turn to a terminal. Then you login as root and enter the command init 3. After that you can install your new graphics driver freely, without problems. When finish you can enter init 5 to launch the graphical environment again and test the new settings.
    I hope this made the init thing more clear to you.
    All of you are saying me in init3 is no graphic.I have Nvidia card and what do I have to do to download and install in init3 (typing).

    Yes it is the fist time ever I will use init3 and please I need another push how to learn about to download or install in init3.

    Please could you be kind to help me out.
    I appreciate fro helping me.

    Mike

  10. #10

    Default Re: I don`t get it with init5 and init3

    If you're just trying to install a package you can do "zypper in [name of package]"

    Without being clearer about what you're trying to install it's hard to answer...

    What is the card? Do you know which driver you're meant to be installing?

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