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Thread: Transferring old /home to new system.

  1. #1

    Default Transferring old /home to new system.

    Background is that I had Suse 10.0 installed, taking up the whole drive and (mistakenly) with /home on same partition as everything else.

    Objective:- I wanted to move up to OpenSuSe 11.1 but keep my existing /home directory and data.

    First I used the Installer DVD to resize the existing partition to create enough space for a new install.

    I then tried, for the first time the Internet Installation. All I can say is that it is simply brilliant. It worked without a hitch. Took a while (about 2.5 hours) as there were over 2.5 GB to download and install but download speeds of up to 600kB/sec were usual which is good for my connection. I did it at night using UK mirror.

    Anyhow here is my problem. The system now boots with the new grub (different from what I expected) and to the new system. I can of course see the old partitions so please could somebody help me to:-

    1. Clean out the old system except for swap which has been adopted by new installation.
    2. Unmount the home directory of the new installation and mount the old /home which is on a different partition and file system I think.

    Budgie2

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Central Florida (United States)
    Posts
    44

    Default Re: Transferring old /home to new system.

    I believe this has been discussed multiple times here. At least I have answered it before.

    In any case, the simplest solution would be to put a second drive in the system and copy the /home to /anothername.

    Blow away the entire first drive (once you validate data is there -- especially the .directories -- for thunderbird evolution whatever...

    Install the OS on the old drive and during the install mount the /anothername as home


    Another suggestion, tar czf username.tar.gz /home/username put the tar files on dvd, backup drive, ftp location, whatever and just do a complete reinstall and then tar xzf username.tar.gz username/oldDATA and grab what you need. This gives the best of both worlds -- a clean install and a backup.

    Found this How To for you: http://www.swerdna.net.au/linhowtomovehome.html
    Last edited by wshawn; 30-Jan-2009 at 04:43. Reason: Added link

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    24,884

    Default Re: Transferring old /home to new system.

    Quote Originally Posted by Budgie2 View Post
    Background is that I had Suse 10.0 installed, taking up the whole drive and (mistakenly) with /home on same partition as everything else.

    Objective:- I wanted to move up to OpenSuSe 11.1 but keep my existing /home directory and data.

    First I used the Installer DVD to resize the existing partition to create enough space for a new install.

    I then tried, for the first time the Internet Installation. All I can say is that it is simply brilliant. It worked without a hitch. Took a while (about 2.5 hours) as there were over 2.5 GB to download and install but download speeds of up to 600kB/sec were usual which is good for my connection. I did it at night using UK mirror.

    Anyhow here is my problem. The system now boots with the new grub (different from what I expected) and to the new system. I can of course see the old partitions so please could somebody help me to:-

    1. Clean out the old system except for swap which has been adopted by new installation.
    2. Unmount the home directory of the new installation and mount the old /home which is on a different partition and file system I think.

    Budgie2
    Edit /etc/fstab change the entry for /home replacing the old partition for the new one. No normal users should be loged in. So do CNTRL-ALT-F1 and login as root in the console.
    Code:
    umount /home
    vi /etc/fstab # and do the change
    mount /home
    and you should be done.
    Henk van Velden

  4. #4
    Tilman Schmidt NNTP User

    Default Re: Transferring old /home to new system.

    Budgie2 schrieb:
    > Background is that I had Suse 10.0 installed, taking up the whole drive
    > and (mistakenly) with /home on same partition as everything else.
    >
    > Objective:- I wanted to move up to OpenSuSe 11.1 but keep my existing
    > /home directory and data.
    >
    > First I used the Installer DVD to resize the existing partition to
    > create enough space for a new install.
    > [...] The system now boots with the new grub
    > (different from what I expected) and to the new system. I can of course
    > see the old partitions so please could somebody help me to:-
    >
    > 1. Clean out the old system except for swap which has been adopted by
    > new installation.
    > 2. Unmount the home directory of the new installation and mount the
    > old /home which is on a different partition and file system I think.



    So if I understand correctly, you have now two partitions:
    - your old system's root partition containing your entire 10.0
    installation, including the /home directory tree you want to
    recover
    - the new root partition containing your entire 11.1 installation,
    including a new, more or less empty, /home directory tree you'd
    like to replace by the old one

    This is quite possible, but takes a few more steps than hcvv suggested.
    I recommend doing the following from a text console as root:

    1. mount the old root partition in a temporary location

    2. delete everything except the home and etc directories from it

    3. move everything in the home directory one directory level up,
    because mounting the partition to /home will prefix all paths on
    it with /home; then delete the now empty home directory

    4. make the UIDs of the old home directories match the new system,
    by either
    a) creating the user accounts on the new system with the same
    UIDs they had on the old one; you can look up the old UIDs in
    the file etc/passwd (which is why I told you to keep etc)
    or
    b) changing ownership of each home directory and all its
    contents to the new UID of the corresponding user

    5. move everything from your new system's /home directory to the
    future home partition (otherwise you won't be able to access or
    even delete it anymore once the partition is mounted), either
    to its final place or to a temporary location

    6. unmount the prospective home partition from its temporary mount
    point and mount it on /home

    7. test by logging in as one of the users of the old system

    8. make an appropriate entry in /etc/fstab

    9. clean up by deleting /home/etc and everything else you don't
    need anymore from the old system

    If anything's unclear or you need more detailed instructions, feel
    free to ask.

    HTH
    T.

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