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Thread: Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

  1. #1
    stube40 NNTP User

    Default Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

    Hello everyone,

    This is my first post, please let me briefly introduce myself - I am an embedded systems engineer with 15 years of experience related to coding of firmware and software in C and C++ across 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit (Win32s) systems. I am well versed in Microsoft development environments such as Visual Studio and Embedded Visual C++.

    I am starting a new job soon and they are very Linux orientated - I would like to give myself a crash course on Linux to get a head start so as I don't embarrass myself.

    I'm currently downloading openSuse 11 and will install it on a spare PC I have. After that, I'm looking for tips on exercises I can do that will bring me up to speed in the shortest space of time.

    Obviously, they'll be looking to see I can use Linux proficiently, hence command line stuff I imagine is imperative. After that, I imagine it would be good to be able to install a C compiler and compile one of my C or C++ projects and get something useful running.

    If anyone has any suggestions, I'd love to hear then.

    Thanks alot,
    Stuart.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

    Once you have openSUSE installed add the Development section from the Patterns in Software Management

    Some links to check
    SUSE Build Tutorial - openSUSE

    Welcome to openSUSE.org - openSUSE
    bash commands - Linux MAN Pages
    Linux Newbie Guide: Shortcuts And Commands
    Linux Newbie Administrator Guide
    Leap 15.1_KDE
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  3. #3
    Bud NNTP User

    Default Re: Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

    caf4926 wrote:
    > Once you have openSUSE installed add the Development section from the
    > Patterns in Software Management
    >
    > Some links to check
    > 'SUSE Build Tutorial - openSUSE'
    > (http://en.opensuse.org/SUSE_Build_Tutorial)
    >
    > 'Welcome to openSUSE.org - openSUSE'
    > (http://en.opensuse.org/Welcome_to_openSUSE.org)
    > 'bash commands - Linux MAN Pages' (http://www.ss64.com/bash/)
    > 'Linux Newbie Guide: Shortcuts And Commands'
    > (http://www.unixguide.net/linux/linuxshortcuts.shtml)
    > 'Linux Newbie Administrator Guide'
    > (http://linux-newbie.sunsite.dk/html/lnag.html)


    Adding to that:

    Don't forget that openSUSE is only ONE of many "flavors" of Linux. When I first
    got into Linux an "old-head" *nix guy told me to think of each one as a
    different OS. Actually, there is not quite THAT much difference--but there is a
    lot of variation in what is under the hood (file placement, naming conventions,
    etc). The variations persist even though there has been a push lately (a few
    years) to grow a oneness. Just beware that _everything_ you learn while using
    openSUSE is *not* automatically applicable to Ubuntu, Red Hat, Debian, etc etc etc..

    Fortunately, there are lots of mostly generic basics available on the net. I'd
    advise as you learn openSUSE (from the above excellent list) you also learn the
    generic Linux fundamentals, which you can find in (for example):

    "The Linux Documentation Project" <http://tldp.org/index.html>

    (do not overlook these, from that project
    "Bash Guide for Beginners" <http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-Guide/html/>
    "Advanced Scripting Guide" <http://tldp.org/guides.html>

    and, my all time favorite:
    "Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition" <http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz>

    and a handy memory jogger until you have mastered the art:
    "One Page Linux Manual" <http://homepage.powerup.com.au/~squadron/>

    oh, and don't forget that Google is your friend, search from here:
    <http://www.google.com/linux>

    Finally, my last piece of advice--don't try to blow smoke up the skirts of the
    old heads, and read this before your first day a work:

    "Linux is Not Windows" <http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm>

    Oh, and never forget that Linux is that stuff *below* the stuff you SEE on the
    desktop. That is (with reference to the just above note on Windows):

    1. KDE is Not Linux. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K_Desktop_Environment>

    2. GNOME is Not Linux. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOME>

    3. Xfce is Not Linux. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xfce>

    4. NONE of the other Desktop Environments is Linux.
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_X_Window_System_desktop_environments>

    5. X, X11, X-Window System is Not Linux.
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_Window_System>

    6. Therefore, Linux is an operating system which can (or may not) run any of the
    above, and much more. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux>

    I say all of that so you don't get the idea that once you have installed
    openSUSE with KDE and mastered setting up and using it that you have "learned
    Linux".

    Good luck, you have a lot of ground to cover.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

    Some basics: Concepts - openSUSE

  5. #5
    stube40 NNTP User

    Default Re: Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

    Thanks guys for your help

  6. #6
    Bud NNTP User

    Default Re: Tips required for crash course in openSuSE

    stube40 wrote:
    > Thanks guys for your help


    Let us know how it goes. And, come back and help as you gain proficiency.

    Oh, and as questions arise, ask.

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