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Thread: KDE CORPORATE

  1. #1
    dbenavides NNTP User

    Question KDE CORPORATE

    NOW I AM PARTICIPATING IN A PROJECT OF MIGRATION TO THE SERVERS was decided to change the Windows 2000 Server, Debian, AND FOR THE SEASONS OF WORK IS CHANGING WITH WINDOWS XP OFICCE 2007 to openSUSE 11 with KDE 4.0.

    THE PROBLEM IS THE NEXT; ABOVE WITH WINDOWS 2000 SERVER You could POLICIES AND MANAGE restrictions for workstations. NOW I AM SEEKING THE FORM OF BLOCK THE POSSIBILITY OF USERS MAY CHANGE THE FUND TO SCREEN openSUSE KDE 4.0.

    HOW prevent users from changing the wallpaper KDE 4.0?

  2. #2
    sleepy NNTP User

    Default Re: KDE CORPORATE

    In my opinion KDE4 is NOT yet ready to introduce to the work place.

    Instead, I would use Gnome.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: KDE CORPORATE

    The fundamental difficulty you have is that Linux is about choice and so things like the wallpaper are normally left to the user.

    However, I assume that if you find the folder where KDE stores the wallpapers, remove all the wallpapers except the one you want users to use and then make the folder writeable only by root, you will stop all but the most technically astute users. However, those who poke around will probably spot that there is a facility to change wallpapers and you will have to explain to them why you have disabled this function.

  4. #4
    Gilbert NNTP User

    Default Re: KDE CORPORATE

    john hudson wrote:

    >
    > The fundamental difficulty you have is that Linux is about choice and so
    > things like the wallpaper are normally left to the user.
    >


    While I agree with the above statement, as an ex-Windows sysadmin, I have
    sympathy with the view point of the OP. When you have an estate of several
    hundred users who can all configure their systems differently and choose
    their own software, support becomes an absolute nightmare. Whilst I'm not
    sure that I'd go to the level of controlling wallpaper, I would be
    interested to hear about how others "control" large numbers of linux PC's
    in a corporate environment.

    Regards

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Central Florida (United States)
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    Default Re: KDE CORPORATE

    You could always edit the /etc/skel.


    Create a test user, establish the proper desktop options in the users options, and then find out which file holds the data

    Next add that appropriate file structure:

    In gnome it is .gnome

    inside that folder create

    the backgrounds.xml file

    chown root:root backgrounds.xml
    chmod -w backgrounds.xml

    Linux is FIRST about permission, then it is about choices

    change the relevant background file to only have the background you want.

    This is off the top of my head, but the concept should be valid.

    Many corporate environments do not want their "image" polluted with individuality. I didn't say I agree with it. It just happens to be true.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: KDE CORPORATE

    Quote Originally Posted by Gilbert View Post
    When you have an estate of several hundred users who can all configure their systems differently and choose
    their own software, support becomes an absolute nightmare. Whilst I'm not
    sure that I'd go to the level of controlling wallpaper, I would be interested to hear about how others "control" large numbers of linux PC's in a corporate environment.
    I wonder if you are missing a fundamental point about how choice is managed in Linux. Unlike in Windows, a user's preferences in, for example, OpenOffice, are stored in their /home directory. They have no authority to change anything in the main program. As long as a user does not have root privileges, they cannot download a different version of a program.

    I can remember when the IBM PC got out and everyone was setting their own computer up differently, Even in the 1990s there was a major crash of the social security system which resulted from people 'upgrading' their local computers so that they were incompatible with the upgrade software supplied from HQ.

    Linux has inherited the security provisions of Unix and therefore those sorts of problems do not exist.

    Again you as a sysadmin have choice in how flexibly or how rigorously you use those facilities.
    Last edited by john_hudson; 24-Oct-2008 at 13:46. Reason: Typo

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: KDE CORPORATE

    To get the kind of user management that a widows server has you need the equivalent suse version.
    That is enterprise server

    Geoff
    Core 2 Duo 3.16GHz, 8GB DDR2, 3.5TB, GeForce 9600 GT, Amilo LCD 26", OS 11.1 x86_64, KDE4.2.4 (2)
    My wine tips & tricks

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