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Thread: Corrupt xorg.conf?

  1. #1

    Default Corrupt xorg.conf?

    I've tried switching a few graphics drivers to see what their functions were, but when trying to switch to Mesa (with SAX2 -r -m command), it gave me the command line (with the infamous "Have a lot of fun...") instead. Well, I thought the driver wasn't installed properly, so I tried switching back to RadeonHD. SAX couldn't load the GUI, so I rebooted into failsafe mode. There everything went good, but... Still the command line only mode. Then I tried switching to FGLRX, I even reinstalled that driver, still nothing! Even switching to Vesa won't work. Only the failsafe xorg.conf.install works, but it has very bad resolution.
    So, is there something wrong in my xorg.conf, SAX2 generation or the driver installations conflicting with each other?
    My current xorg.conf (well, I'm in failsafe mode, this one's what it tries to load usually):
    INI pastebin - collaborative debugging tool

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    GreatEmerald wrote:
    > I've tried switching a few graphics drivers to see what their functions
    > were


    just revert to the backup of your operating system and its
    configuration which you made before beginning the uncharted
    experiments...(or just revert back to the xorg.conf which WAS working
    ok....you kept a safe copy of that _one_ file, at least.....right?)

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    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via NNTP, Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    Yes, I did (actually FGLRX makes them automatically), but strangely that didn't work too.
    And what do you mean, backup of OS?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    > And what do you mean, backup of OS?

    for example my "operating system" (everything outside of /home) is
    just about 7GB, so it is not so difficult nor time consuming to copy
    that over to an /archive partition....(i'm sure one could get away
    with less than *all* of that...i mean, no real utility in keeping a
    copy of all the docs, man pages,stuff in /proc and etc)

    i use rsync to do that...but, there are free and commercial backup
    programs available...in fact, there is one built into YaST, but as
    i've never used it i can't tell you much about it, other than how to
    get there:

    YaST > System > System Backup

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    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via NNTP, Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE
    3.5.7, SUSE Linux 10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  5. #5

    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    No, I don't have a full backup... But if it gets too worse I can always do a fresh install!
    Anything that might cause problems in the current XORG.conf file?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    > No, I don't have a full backup... But if it gets too worse I can always
    > do a fresh install!


    yep....i know that is (imo) a bad habit many picked up during their
    stay in Redmond's Jail....but, re-install is not actually a good
    strategy for maintaining a stable/reliable system..

    and, just think of ALL the updates and programs you will have to add
    _again_ just to get back to were you were yesterday....

    sure, i know many only back up their /home, but with the level of
    updates driven ever higher by the six month release cycle (and the
    number of adds i make to a standard install) it becomes quite a
    time-sink to reinstall every time an experiment goes ary

    > Anything that might cause problems in the current XORG.conf file?


    sorry, i didn't look at it, and probably wouldn't be able to spot the
    problems anyway..

    one habit you might consider, do as i do and BEFORE you do anything
    that MIGHT wiggle the contents of xorg.conf make copy/backup of that
    file..

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via NNTP, Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE
    3.5.7, SUSE Linux 10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  7. #7

    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    Yes, I know it takes a long time to reinstall, yet there's nothing that could go wrong in a vanilla install.
    So anyway, what should I do if I don't like reinstalling? I can use the fallback xorg.conf and change it by hand and see if that works, but what should I actually change?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    > I can use the fallback xorg.conf and change it by hand and see if
    > that works, but what should I actually change?


    imagine this scenario:

    1. everything is running smoothly (and has been for
    days/weeks/months) and you decide to "switch a few graphics to see
    what their functions were"

    2. knowing that that _might_ result in a black (white, checkerboard,
    whatever) screen *OR* worse you decide to make yourself a "way back"
    to "running smoothly"

    3. select a "way back" plan:

    a. one way to do that is to do a FULL backup of your entire system;

    b. another, is to do a FULL backup of all but /home (and maybe some
    others, BECAUSE you ALREADY have them protected);

    c. a third and MUCH more likely to fail way is to KNOW all the files
    that will/might be changed when trying to "switch a few graphics to
    see what their functions were"

    (d. the SURE way to require a re-install is to make experiments with
    NONE of the above as your plan)

    4. So, you decide to live dangerously (but with SOME chance of "way
    back" success) and back up the only file you _know_ will be changed:
    xorg.conf, and you can do that in MANY MANY ways...the way i do it is:

    a. open a terminal and become root by typing

    su - (do NOT forget the -)

    b. go to the directory/folder where the file lives (how you
    determine that is up to you--there are MANY ways) by typing

    cd /etc/X11

    c. to make SURE you know the exact name of the file to backup you
    command a 'list' of files with similar names by typing

    ls -al xorg*

    which in my case since i HAVE done this before is currently:

    Code:
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4122 2008-08-19 16:33 xorg.conf
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5325 2008-05-18 09:20 xorg.conf.install
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root   36 2008-08-19 16:33 xorg.conf.md5
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4122 2008-05-18 10:10 xorg.conf.nvidia-pre
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4122 2008-05-18 10:26 xorg.conf.nvidia-post
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4122 2008-08-19 16:33 xorg.conf.saxsave
    here, i see the name of the file is exactly xorg.conf (all the
    others are previous backups, some by me, some by script, for example
    the one ending in saxsave was made the LAST time i ran sax)

    d. copy the file to be backed up by typing CAREFULLY

    cp xorg.conf xorg.conf.BAK

    where .BAK can be whatever you want it to be, like:
    xorg.conf.BAK1
    xorg.conf.graphicSwitching-pre
    xorg.conf.before19Sep2008
    xorg.conf.2008-09-19

    e. now, lets CHECK and see if we really MADE a backup, type

    ls -al xorg*

    yours should now show, at least:

    xorg.conf
    xorg.conf.BAK

    f. do your all your graphic switching magic...if all is well when
    you are finished you have used a LITTLE time that you could have
    saved--but, with a LOT at risk. if, on the other hand, you now have a
    machine you can't use, you can FIX it by replacing the now corrupt
    xorg.conf with a file you KNOW to be good/usable prior to the
    experiments by typing (from 'safe mode'; or whatever option grub
    gives you to land on a command line without starting the gui [read
    elsewhere]; or using (for example) a Knoppix CD/DVD; or whatever)

    cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.BAK xorg.conf

    g. boot and your machine will work exactly as it did prior to
    beginning *IF* _nothing_ else had changed..

    NOTE: i do not know EVERYTHING that was, or might have been changed
    by your "when trying to switch to Mesa (with SAX2 -r -m command)"
    BUT, maybe maybe maybe if you take a look in /etc/X11 you too will
    see a file named xorg.conf.saxsave and, maybe maybe maybe it is a
    copy of the last working xorg.conf before your "trying to switch to Mesa"

    if it were me, i'd probably (before the pain of re-install) *TRY* (as
    root):
    NOTE: before trying this read the caveat in my sig!!!

    cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.saxsave xorg.conf

    if that doesn't work you might TRY: look at the dates of all the
    other /etc/X11/xorg.conf.xxxxxx files, and pick the one nearest to,
    but older than the date/time of your experiments, and copy it to
    xorg.conf..

    if that doesn't work, i guess you have to fall back to the Redmond
    Plan: re-install

    good luck and Plan Ahead! (ps: hopefully the above makes sense and i
    didn't make too many typos....i've NOT taken the time to proof it)

    --
    see caveat: http://tinyurl.com/6aagco
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via NNTP, Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE
    3.5.7, SUSE Linux 10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

  9. #9

    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    What a large post, that... Doesn't quite help. Yes, I now know that I should have made backups, no need to remind that in every word. All that command line stuff is not necessary, you can run konqueror from SU and do everything in a nice GUI. All you're saying is "try restoring other backups". I can test all of them, but I doubt that would give results as I already tried a few before. The point is that somehow only Vesa works with the current xorg.conf...
    Ah well, guess I should find some time and read xorg.conf(5x) manual page and Xorg.conf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Corrupt xorg.conf?

    >

    you are welcome.

    --
    DenverD (Linux Counter 282315) via NNTP, Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, KDE
    3.5.7, SUSE Linux 10.3, 2.6.22.18-0.2-default #1 SMP i686 athlon

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