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Thread: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

  1. #1

    Angry Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    Chmod just completely and utterly raped my installation of Gnome Opensuse 11.0. Completely. It's now about 5cm from useless. I tried to chmod -R 777 /* my .wine directory because Windows programs were whining about various things often caused by permissions. Lo and behold, there's a system link to every drive's root on my filesystem. I didn't think it was anythign serious at the time, as 777 is just global read/write, and I'm the only user. Lo and behold, things stop working. Wine, some other stuff, no biggie, I figured a restart would clear it up. So I do, and gnome doesn't load its panels at startup, I get a message saying something about updates failing (95% sure it's the auto update checker.) Firefox works, but that's about it. Now, what can I do short of reformatting? I don't mind spending some time in the reinstaller, nor am I scared of a rescue prompt. I tried package checking, and now su works, but gnome is still destroyed. The software manager won't work, nor will 75% of other apps.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    I jsut can't believe I destroyed my installation with Chmod

  3. #3
    ab@novell.com NNTP User

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

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    If this is really the command you used then you changed your entire
    drive's permissions directly, not by following a link:

    'chmod -R 777 /* my'

    You have a '/' as the first character in your path, and you should have
    had './' so it would have meant "from-here/everything" instead of
    "from-root/everything". Also chmod does not follow symlinks by default
    so unless you used one of the switches to make it do so that shouldn't
    have been a problem (but considering the command above that is irrelevant).

    Anyway some applications will not run when their programs have too many
    permissions for security reasons. Key-based authentication of SSH is an
    example of this... if too many users have access to the public key store
    in a user's home directory the SSH server will (by a setting I believe,
    that is enabled appropriately by default) not allow key-based
    authentication until permissions are fixed. If I were you I'd be sure
    my data were backed up as much as possible and would then boot into a
    Repair installation and would run that. Yast can, I believe, be forced
    to lay down all the packages for its installed RPMs again to correct
    things like file corruption, permissions, etc. This could likely be a
    decent-sized pain but that's about it. Reinstalling over your current
    system (without formatting) will likely do about the same thing.

    Good luck.





    Myounage wrote:
    > Chmod just completely and utterly raped my installation of Gnome
    > Opensuse 11.0. Completely. It's now about 5cm from useless. I tried to
    > chmod -R 777 /* my .wine directory because Windows programs were whining
    > about various things often caused by permissions. Lo and behold,
    > there's a system link to every drive's root on my filesystem. I didn't
    > think it was anythign serious at the time, as 777 is just global
    > read/write, and I'm the only user. Lo and behold, things stop working.
    > Wine, some other stuff, no biggie, I figured a restart would clear it
    > up. So I do, and gnome doesn't load its panels at startup, I get a
    > message saying something about updates failing (95% sure it's the auto
    > update checker.) Firefox works, but that's about it. Now, what can I
    > do short of reformatting? I don't mind spending some time in the
    > reinstaller, nor am I scared of a rescue prompt. I tried package
    > checking, and now su works, but gnome is still destroyed. The software
    > manager won't work, nor will 75% of other apps.
    >
    >

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    =rHKh
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    as the previous user said you probably forgot the . infront of the / and thus you did your root and because of the -R everything below it. but thinking a bit more that can only be done if you where su (root) at that time.. odd

    I can only think of recovery cd also and try to force yast to update all packages even there is no update of them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    Aside from the disasters awaiting people who work as root and hit return before reading the line twice, I think that the number 777 ought to be erased from the consciousness of all Unix/Linux users. I can't think of a situation where it is appropriate. Even /tmp and /var/tmp are 1777, a critical difference.

    Old Unix joke:

    You told me to type rm * .o and it said ".o not found"

  6. #6

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    This will not make you feel better, but I did the same a few weeks ago with a Debian installation, cause I did not have write access to a partition that is shared with an openSUSE installation on the same computer. The moment I had hit <Enter> I thought "*****" but it was to late.

    Looking up the web, if there is any trick to bring my installation back, I found out this happens a lot to people. I did a reinstall cause there was nothing else to do.

    So you are not alone.
    Now with new flavor: openSUSE 11.1 PPC on Apple Titanium PowerBook G4 Onyx

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    If you weren't root, just re-create your account

    If you were, you can try:
    su -c "SuSEconfig --module permissions"

    Which might fix "some" issues.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    I learned this a LOOONG time ago when I was first experimenting with Linux. NEVER EVER chmod your /etc/ directory to 0777 as it will prevent you from ever logging in as root or using su/sudo.
    My guess is that it is a security feature, since if /etc/ is 777 any user can edit any file there... and prolly edit their files to give them sudo permissions... Hence root account is disabled to prevent them doing damage anywhere else on the system they're not allowed...

    Unless you know what permissions everything was, you're SOL... though if you keep /home on its own partition, it can be kept when doing a fresh install. (and so you keep your preferences etc)

  9. #9
    Tilman Schmidt NNTP User

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    Myounage schrieb:
    > I jsut can't believe I destroyed my installation with Chmod


    Well, not destroyed as such. The files themselves are still there.
    The damage you did could in principle be repaired by going through
    every directory on your system and restoring the correct permissions.
    But it's a lot of work. Reinstalling will probably be easier.[1]

    But you shouldn't be surprised. If you work as root (which you
    obviously did, and unnecessarily too) disaster is always only a
    keystroke away - in your case, a missed keystroke. Learn from it:
    never work as root except if really necessary, and while working
    as root, always doublecheck your command before hitting Enter.

    HTH
    T.

    [1] I remember earlier SUSE releases having a file /etc/permissions
    containing essential permission settings, along with a mechanism to
    reapply them in YaST, but it seems to have gone.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Chmod completely and utterly RAPED install!

    Quote Originally Posted by ken_yap View Post
    Aside from the disasters awaiting people who work as root and hit return before reading the line twice, I think that the number 777 ought to be erased from the consciousness of all Unix/Linux users. I can't think of a situation where it is appropriate. Even /tmp and /var/tmp are 1777, a critical difference.

    Old Unix joke:
    Wine. Many Windows programs DO NOT LIKE having to read anything that isn't 777. IE Steam will sometimes not launch games if the .gcf files are anything else. What's the best way to reinstall and keep most my home dir? I don't mind setting folders getting wiped out, but what's the best way?
    EDIT: I used the reccommended partitioning system and had ~150gb of space.

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