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Thread: Making the switch...

  1. #1

    Default Making the switch...

    From Linux Mint, that is.

    I switched from Windows around November or so right into Ubuntu. Got sick of that and went to Mint, which was recommended by a friend. Based on Ubuntu, but without all the training wheels, it felt a little better. Lately I've been anticipating the switch to openSUSE, and the tipping factor was the fact that my update to 2.6.26 caused a lot of bugs. My audio suddenly became very distorted, all my programs, though installed, could only be run through Terminal, and to top that off, many of my drivers stopped working. What excuse do i have now for putting it off?

    But first, a few questions:

    I'd like to keep all my media (videos, music, etc.) but thats just about it. Should i make a backup of my entire home folder, or should I just preserve the folders specific to what i wish to keep?

    How does SUSE work on laptops? I have an HP dv6433cl and I've noted that Mint makes me jump through a lot of hoops to get it to work correctly. I know SUSE is a hugely supported distro, so I want to guess that it does. Still...

    I'm looking for a clean install. I want to pick just about every program from scratch. Does SUSE do all that for me like Mint did, or will I start with nothing but an OS?

    Thanks ahead of time, guys. I'll try and not be a "one time poster" like i see happen on all sorts of help forums. Chances are I'll be back for some advice or to just hang out.

    nobhdy

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Making the switch...

    Quote Originally Posted by nobhdy View Post
    From Linux Mint, that is.
    I believe Mint includes codecs and drivers out of the box. With openSUSE you need to install them manually, but it is pretty simple. There are one-click installers.

    Restricted Formats/11.0 - openSUSE-Community
    ATI - openSUSE
    NVIDIA - openSUSE

    I'd like to keep all my media (videos, music, etc.) but thats just about it. Should i make a backup of my entire home folder, or should I just preserve the folders specific to what i wish to keep?
    Yes, back it up. Ideally this is what you want to do in the future.

    Set aside say 50 megs during partitioning for /boot
    Set aside maybe 1 gig for swap.
    Set aside say 10-20 gigs for / (programs) You may not even need that.
    Then set aside the rest of your hard drive as a /home partition. If you ever want to wipe everything and switch distros, or do a clean install, you wipe the /boot and / partitions, and you keep your /home partition with all your music, files, etc.

    How does SUSE work on laptops? I have an HP dv6433cl and I've noted that Mint makes me jump through a lot of hoops to get it to work correctly. I know SUSE is a hugely supported distro, so I want to guess that it does. Still...
    My wife has a very similar laptop. You may have issues with the wireless card depending on the chip. I had to manually install a different madwifi driver. Support for the AR5007 chips or whatever seems to be in an experimental branch, and not the plain madwifi line. If it worked fine with Mint, it may just work fine with openSUSE. I'm not sure which wireless card you have.

    However, most things just worked great with openSUSE. Their hardware support is really good.

    I'm looking for a clean install. I want to pick just about every program from scratch. Does SUSE do all that for me like Mint did, or will I start with nothing but an OS?
    You can do just a base/core install with no GUI, and then pick packages. In fact, with the DVD installer you can custom pick each individual package you want or don't want. I haven't seen the Mint installer, but Ubuntu gives you no options at all. The openSUSE 11 installer is one of the best I've ever seen. Simple, yet powerful.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Making the switch...

    But first, a few questions:

    I'd like to keep all my media (videos, music, etc.) but thats just about it. Should i make a backup of my entire home folder, or should I just preserve the folders specific to what i wish to keep?

    As /home normally holds a lot of application specific hidden files, a lot depends on whether you have valuable data stored in them. If you don't know what will work with the new distro, backup everything and then copy over what you find you need after the fresh install.

    How does SUSE work on laptops? I have an HP dv6433cl and I've noted that Mint makes me jump through a lot of hoops to get it to work correctly. I know SUSE is a hugely supported distro, so I want to guess that it does. Still...

    It depends what you want it to do; my four year old laptop works fine except for the modem and wireless BUT I'm on cable broadband and don't use wireless. On some laptops you will find both work out of the box and for others you will be able to download suitable drivers.

    I'm looking for a clean install. I want to pick just about every program from scratch. Does SUSE do all that for me like Mint did, or will I start with nothing but an OS?

    At install you choose Gnome, KDE3.5 or KDE4 and you are then given a choice of several levels of package install from minimal to fairly complete. If you want to get going quickly, accept a standard package and then install what else you want after everything has been set up.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Making the switch...

    As someone new to Linux, you probably had Gnome with Mint.

    I can't recommend KDE 3.5.9 enough. The default desktop may not look super sexy, but KDE offers far more configuration options. KDE is faster, uses less memory, and offers tons more features.

    KDE 4 is new and unstable. Some people love it. Some people hate it.

    You can install Gnome, KDE 3, and KDE 4 all at the same time. At the login screen (by default, openSUSE will auto-login you in if there is only one account on the box, so you need to log out to see the login screen) there is an option to choose your session, such as Gnome, KDE 3, or KDE 4.

    Try them all, but if you want KDE 4, upgrade to the newest packages. It is evolving quite rapidly, and the 4.0.4 packages on the DVD are pretty old now.

    I'd recommend the following one-click installer for KDE 4 if you want it:

    http://download.opensuse.org/reposit...E4-DEFAULT.ymp

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Making the switch...

    Thread moved to Install/Boot/Login
    opensuse.org.help.install-boot-login
    Last edited by kastorff; 19-Jul-2008 at 12:10.
    Keith Kastorff

  6. #6

    Default Re: Making the switch...

    The install went very well. I will have to take some time adjusting to KDE, but it shouldn't be very hard.

    A few more questions:

    How do i do command-line updates. I'm used to simply typing in apt-get update to do that, but it says that it isn't a command. How does KDE do things?

    Any way to make it a bit faster? I don't have any desktop effects on or anything like that, but theres some noticable lag. Perhaps this is because I havn't updated anything yet?

    Anyways, I'll keep you posted on my move.

    nobhdy

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Making the switch...

    Zypper/Usage/11.0 - openSUSE

    apt-get is a Debian thing, though technically I believe you can use apt-get with openSUSE if you want. You have to install it.

    The openSUSE tool is called zypper

    Code:
    zypper install mplayer
    As far as speed goes, you can use YaST to disable background services you don't need and such.

    KDE 3 has a nifty control panel for settings called kcontrol and there is a great website called kde-look.org with icons, color schemes, themes, etc.

    I really like the domino widget style because it allows for custom gradients, as you can see here:

    http://enderandrew.com/images/concept.png

    That was a concept image I made for possible openSUSE defaults.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Making the switch...

    I'm starting to wish i had jumped straight into suse as opposed to ubuntu. With all that hand-holding, I'm more lost than I should be. I think I'm getting the hang of manually installing things with commands, but that's going to take some practice.

    First on my list is to install Awesome Window Manager which I wanted to use in Mint, but didn't want to work for some reason or another.

    Second, get some practice with the Konsole. Any recommended aps?


    And before I forget, how do i acquire dependencies. In Mint, the package manager took care of all that, so I'm quite at a loss about this.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Making the switch...

    if you don't want to do it on the command line go into to YAST.

    The select the add software option

    Then go search for what you want to install through there.

    You may need to add some repositories, but it resolves dependencies for you too.


    Zypper can do resolving of stuff too but you have to use it from the command line so if you are more graphically oriented, most Suse users add stuff from the YAST utility

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Making the switch...

    Quote Originally Posted by nobhdy View Post
    First on my list is to install Awesome Window Manager which I wanted to use in Mint, but didn't want to work for some reason or another.
    Software.openSUSE.org is a good starting point when searching for software. For example it gives you for awesome this result

    You can then use the one click install feature which adds the repository and installs the selected package(s) (with dependency resolving included).

    hope this helps

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