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Thread: openSUSE 11 won't start

  1. #1
    grinda NNTP User

    Default openSUSE 11 won't start

    Hi!
    I have successfully installed openSUSE 11 (KDE 4), but I can't login as regular user, luckily(?) it's possible to login as root. Here's /var/log/messages:
    http://pastebin.com/m2da7f080
    Could someone take a look at it?
    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    2,429

    Default Re: openSUSE 11 won't start

    I didn't see anything related in the log (did you?). Have you tried the obvious, delete and re-add the user in YaST?

  3. #3
    grinda NNTP User

    Default Re: openSUSE 11 won't start

    It didn't help

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    2,429

    Default Re: openSUSE 11 won't start

    Frankly, if you haven't gotten in as a user yet, and so don't have any user information set up, it may be easiest (and fastest) to just re-install. It's hard to say where the problem is, it could be in the user set up, in the password authentication, or with the login manager (kdm, gdm). Or something strange that happened during the install. If you want to check a couple of things, you could do this . . .

    At the boot menu, type 3 in the box below. That will boot you to a command prompt. Login as root. If you do:

    #cat /etc/passwd | grep <username> (where <username> is, well, username, without the brackets of course)

    that will confirm that your username is real and in the password authentication list. If you do:

    #passwd -S | grep <username>

    you should see the letters "PS" with your username. That means the password has been set You must have a password. If you do:

    #passwd <username>

    that will prompt you to reset the user password, without having to know the current password. Caution: YaST uses a mechanism to override the Linux default enforcement of strong passwords. If you change the password at the command line, you bypass YaST. Therefore, the password required will be somewhat complex (as it really should be, anyway).

    You could also do #startx to start up KDE or Gnome, go to the /etc/sysconfig Editor module under YaST/System, then Desktop/Display manager and the entry DISPLAYMANAGER, and change kdm or gdm to xdm. Then reboot. This will replace the KDE or Gnome login manager with the simple old X login, and so if the login works here, the problem is with kdm or gdm.

    That's all that comes to mind at the moment. But again, unless you are familiar with doing stuff like above, might be better/quicker to just re-install.

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