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Thread: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

  1. #1
    Michaelus08 NNTP User

    Default Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    I have a PC with one hard disk. Windows XP was pre-installed. There are 2 partitions, C- already full (less than 1 GB free) and F- 70 GB free.

    Q1: Which is the last or best Suse version?

    Q2: Is it possible to install that Suse on my Windows system, still keeping Windows?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    10.3 was the last release and yes you can install it along side Windows.
    Linux user 367344

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    Thank you for participating in our forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelus08 View Post
    I have a PC with one hard disk. Windows XP was pre-installed. There are 2 partitions, C- already full (less than 1 GB free) and F- 70 GB free.
    Keep an eye on the openSUSE installer, but it should spot the "F - 70GB" free, and try to install openSUSE on that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelus08 View Post
    Q1: Which is the last or best Suse version?
    if you wait another couple of weeks (a bit less) then openSUSE-11.0 will be out. It has the makings of a good release.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelus08 View Post
    Q2: Is it possible to install that Suse on my Windows system, still keeping Windows?
    Yes it is. Having a dual boot between windows and Linux is quite common amongst Linux users. OpenSUSE will install a boot manager on your PC called "grub" (part of it will be in your PCs MBR) which, when you turn ON your PC, will give you the choice as to whether you boot to Windows or Linux.

    If you have additional questions please feel free to ask here. If you have not looked already, you could check out our "stickie" for newbies in installing openSUSE:
    NEWBIES - Suse-11.0 Pre-installation PLEASE READ - openSUSE Forums

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    Michaelus08 NNTP User

    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    O.K., thanks for your answers.

    I was thinking to buy a cheap laptop and try to install it there. Hardware compatibilies, I don't know if it will work on a laptop. I was thinking I could destroy my PC trying to install it together with Windows.

    What is your advice?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelus08 View Post
    I was thinking to buy a cheap laptop and try to install it there.
    Re compatibility with a laptop, please take a look at our stickie for this:
    Laptop - openSUSE Forums

    I have a dual boot on our (old) family laptop (Amilo M7400) of openSUSE-10.3 and WinXP. Initially the laptop came with WinXP and openSUSE was installed later. I enjoy having access to a laptop with openSUSE Linux running when I am on business and when on vacation. And with the dual boot, my wife enjoys having access to her WinXP when she is on vacation, and she actually uses the laptop's openSUSE Linux when she is at work (her booting to Linux at work is due to peculiarities of her work environment).

    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelus08 View Post
    I was thinking I could destroy my PC trying to install it together with Windows.
    A dual installation of openSUSE and WinXP is pretty well proven. There can on occasion be hiccups with some hardware, but this can be mostly checked in advance (prior to install openSUSE, or even prior to purchasing the hardware) if one knows the exact details of their hardware (motherboard, drives, graphic cards, sound card, mouse, etc ...). openSUSE newbies can struggle a bit, when it comes to the partitioning. Linux newbies are IMHO best to go for the KDE-3.5.9 (or Gnome) desktops, and stay away from KDE-4.x.x.

    Here are some openSUSE concepts:
    Concepts - openSUSE

    Simply check out the various Linux hardware compatibility guides on the web.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelus08 View Post
    O.K., thanks for your answers.

    I was thinking to buy a cheap laptop and try to install it there. Hardware compatibilies, I don't know if it will work on a laptop. I was thinking I could destroy my PC trying to install it together with Windows.

    What is your advice?
    It is possible to screw up the installation and accidentally wipe out windows, or lets say after installation you somehow messed up the grub loader, or destroyed your windows partition.

    Also by installing suse on the same hard disk as windows, you will erase the windows boot loader (NTLDR) and replace it with grub.

    Grub is capable of booting into linux and windows.

    However, should you wish to remove suse completely (including the grub boot loader) you will need to restore the windows boot loader (NTLDR) in order to boot back into windows.

    This can be done using your xp cd and the recovery console. See below link for more info.

    Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console

    My advice would be ideally for anyone who intends to try out a linux distribution to use a different hard disk and isolate windows completely.

    You can then later configure grub to point to the other hard disk and boot to windows, without touching the windows boot loader.

    This way you have the added benefit that no mater what you do to your linux hard drive, you can still boot into windows.

    So for example, if you screw up grub, just go into your system BIOS and set the windows hard disk as the first boot device.

    Have a read at,

    HOWTO Dual Boot from Windows Bootloader (NTLDR) and why - Gentoo Linux Wiki

    If this is not an option, then it may be a good idea to create a disk image of your hard disk before installing a linux distro.

    I quite like Acronis 11, Complete hard disk drive copy, cloning and image backup software: computer files and disk copying

    In the event of a total screw up, just restore the disk image.

    BTW, the trial version allows you to create a fully working disk image and ability to restore it.

    Newbie Safety tip. You do not need to do this, but as a precaution if going for the 2 hard drive method, before installing your linux distribution physically disconnect to hard disk data cable to your windows drive.

    This will prevent the linux setup or any other software from detecting the drive and it completely removes the possibility of you doing something silly with the partitions / grub loader setup to your windows hard disk.

    After installation reconnect the drive.

    You will then need to later on, edit your grub menu to dual boot. Until then, should you wish to boot into windows, change your BIOS boot order.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    Quote Originally Posted by FizzyFanta View Post
    My advice would be ideally for anyone who intends to try out a linux distribution to use a different hard disk and isolate windows completely.
    I agree FizzyFanta's approach is very safe. FizzyFanta's explanation as to what is involved is a good overview.

    Having stated that, I do think (IMHO) for a newbie, such an approach would be well beyond the capability of a newbie to undertake such a drive removal, OS/software install, then re-install the drive, and then try to reconfigure openSUSE to both mount and boot from the restored drive.

    My recommendation is to just:
    (a) backup all important data, and
    (b) read up on how to do an installation, and
    (c) install.

  8. #8
    Michaelus08 NNTP User

    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    After I read your answers carefully (thanks) I also read the material shown in the given links.

    It seems that laptop producers don't like Linux. I wasn't able to find a single laptop model where everything works perfect. I mean, in those tables, it's either the modem or the network card , sound or video, and so on, that doesn't work.

    Does someone know a laptop model with all details about its parts, for which Suse 10.3 or another distribution works perfectly, completely?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    The Dell Latitude series have always worked well for me...
    One thing to be careful with is mainly the video card. Intel is not known for top of the line graphics but in my experience it just works (don't do any heavy gaming, but compiz runs good and stable).

    Just my two cents,
    Wj
    Have a lot of fun!

  10. #10

    Default Re: Please, just first step- switching to Suse

    Dell Home & Home Office | Ubuntu

    These should work well with opensuse.

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