View RSS Feed

James' openSUSE Bash Scripting (and other things) Blog - Your Comments are Welcome!

YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ

Rating: 2 votes, 4.50 average.
In openSUSE 11.4, the control of your CPU energy usage has been moved to the YaST Power Management module. This How To and FAQ Tells you how to install and enable this CPU control module.

With openSUSE 13.1, this function has been removed from YaST and is no longer selectable as outlined in this blog.

To begin, you must start the YaST Control Center and enter the root user password as normal. Then, proceed to:

YaST / Software / Software Management



In Software Management, lets search on yast2-power:



Check the yast2-power-management package and select the Accept Button on the bottom right to allow it to be installed. Once the package yast2-power-management has been installed, lets Exit YaST and restart the YaST Control Center again. This will allow the new YaST Power Module to appear, but it is not yet ready to be used. Now, we need to go into the Run Level Services as follows:

YaST / System / System Service (Runlevel)

In the System Services window select the Expert Mode Bullet and then find and select the service pm-profiler:



Select the button on the bottom right and Enable the pm-profile Service and answer yes to the added services as requested. Select the button on the bottom left and Start the pm-profiler Servrce. You should get a good start with a 0 error return code. Now select the finish button on the bottom right and allow your selections to be saved. Now, it is time to use the new YaST power module. Please Go To:

YaST / System / Power Management



In the YaST Power Management module, you have four selections. They are:

1. Balanced Low Latency Computing
2. Low Latency Computing
3. Powersaving
4. Default

For Desktop usage, you would most likely use the Low Latency Computing while if using a Laptop, the Powersaving settings would make the most sense. The Balanced Low Latency Computing could be useful when used on a desktop or laptop. Default is what you start up as which does have some power savings enabled. On Laptops or any computer where heat is a problem or where high fan speed noise is a problem, you will want to select Powersaving. Once you have made your selection here, just press the Finish button on the bottom right for it to be accepted. I also might suggest you restart your PC just to make sure this setting is being used.

Anyone using openSUSU 12.1 may find that the YaST Power Management application is not working due to some issue with the pm-profiler not yet discovered. In the mean time, I suggest you look at my bash script cfu which does work with openSUSE 12.1. *** Please note that this may now be fixed. Please report in a comment if this is working for you in openSUSE 12.1 ***

C.F.U. - CPU Frequency Utilitiy - Version 1.10 - For use with the cpufrequtils package - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

Thank You,

Blogs: asroot : Bash : Packet Filter : C.F.U. : GPU's : fewrup : F.S.M. : H.I. : nVIDIA : LNVHW : N.S.F. : S.A.K.C. : MMCHECK
S.A.S.I. : S.C.L.U. : S.G.T.B. : S.K.I.M. : S.L.A.V.E. : S.L.R.C. : S.T.A.R.T. : S.U.F.F. : SYSEdit : systemd : YaST Power

Submit "YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ" to Digg Submit "YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ" to del.icio.us Submit "YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ" to StumbleUpon Submit "YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ" to Google Submit "YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ" to Facebook Submit "YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ" to Twitter

Updated 11-Nov-2013 at 06:44 by jdmcdaniel3

Categories
openSUSE Software

Comments

  1. jdmcdaniel3's Avatar
    Just saw a great suggestion for a new utility to control power from vodoo. The name of the program is called powertop. It is not installed by default and it is intended for Intel CPU based systems. To install powertop open a terminal session and type in:

    sudo zypper install powertop

    Enter the root user password and allow the utility to load. To use, open a terminal session and type in:

    sudo powertop

    Suggestions you can make will be displayed while you watch. It is a very nice utility. To see more on command line options enter the terminal command:

    man powertop

    for more information. Powertop is most useful with our fellow laptop users, but anyone using Intel can give it a try. Thanks vodoo for your suggestion.

    Thank You,
  2. jnsatterfield's Avatar
    Thank you for this post. I'm a newly converted Ubuntu user -- forced to look into alternative distributions by the horror that is the Unity interface, lured into openSuSE by its superior support for programming -- and finding a way to configure my laptop to use less power has been plaguing me ever since I installed openSuSE. I read your post last night and woke up to a computer that was cool to the touch but still running. Thanks again!
  3. jdmcdaniel3's Avatar
    [QUOTE=jnsatterfield;bt231]Thank you for this post. I'm a newly converted Ubuntu user -- forced to look into alternative distributions by the horror that is the Unity interface, lured into openSuSE by its superior support for programming -- and finding a way to configure my laptop to use less power has been plaguing me ever since I installed openSuSE. I read your post last night and woke up to a computer that was cool to the touch but still running. Thanks again![/QUOTE]

    Wow, that is such a good story jnsatterfield and I just love to hear that something I wrote was useful to someone else. Now if you really like openSUSE and if you think you could help others, please come back, read through the help requests in the forum and see what you can do. It is users such as yourself that help make openSUSE so good. And if you have any bash scripting requests, just let me know.

    Thank You,
  4. jdmcdaniel3's Avatar
    So after further testing, while this procedure can be done in openSUSE 12.1, my tests are showing they don't hold true after a reboot. So, my suggestion for openSUSE 12.1 users is to look at my cfu bash script which really does work with openSUSE 12.1:

    [url=http://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/c-f-u-cpu-frequency-utilitiy-version-1-10-use-cpufrequtils-package-40/]C.F.U. - CPU Frequency Utilitiy - Version 1.10 - For use with the cpufrequtils package - Blogs - openSUSE Forums[/url]

    Thank You,
  5. iripu's Avatar
    [QUOTE=jdmcdaniel3;bt249]So after further testing, while this procedure can be done in openSUSE 12.1, my tests are showing they don't hold true after a reboot. So, my suggestion for openSUSE 12.1 users is to look at my cfu bash script which really does work with openSUSE 12.1:

    [url=http://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/c-f-u-cpu-frequency-utilitiy-version-1-10-use-cpufrequtils-package-40/]C.F.U. - CPU Frequency Utilitiy - Version 1.10 - For use with the cpufrequtils package - Blogs - openSUSE Forums[/url]

    Thank You,[/QUOTE]

    Please let me know if it's working in 12.3.
  6. jdmcdaniel3's Avatar
    [QUOTE=iripu;bt848]Please let me know if it's working in 12.3.[/QUOTE]

    The ability to set your profile with YaST still exists and is honored on restart. I don't like the fact that you can not specifically state which speed Governor to use by default for your CPU. My solution is to compile my own kernel using my bash script SAKC and elect to configure your kernel in a GUI, a SAKC option. I then go through the power options, enable all cpu speed governors and set the default to Performance. As always, you can use CFU to change the speed selection.

    [URL="http://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/s-k-c-suse-automated-kernel-compiler-version-2-50-34/"]S.A.K.C. - SUSE Automated Kernel Compiler[/URL]

    [URL="http://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/c-f-u-cpu-frequency-utilitiy-version-1-10-use-cpufrequtils-package-40/"]C.F.U. - CPU Frequency Utilitiy - For use with the cpufrequtils package[/URL]

    Thank You,