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oldcpu's meandering thoughts on Computers, GNU/Linux and openSUSE

CyberPower UT1500E UPS for desktop computer running openSUSE LEAP

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I recently purchased a UPS for my desktop computer which is currently running openSUSE LEAP-15.0.

There is discussion on my deliberations prior to purchasing in this openSUSE thread.

As noted in the title, the UPS I purchased is the CyberPower UT1500E 1500VA/900W, which I believe should be adequate for my 4-year old core-i7 desktop PC. My nominal plan, after there is a power outage, is to have my PC automatically shutdown within 1 minute of the power outage.

The local computer shops did not carry the CyberPower UPS that I wanted, so I ordered on over the internet, and it arrived a few days later.


After an overnight charge, I plugged my desktop PC (but not my monitor nor my speakers) and I also routed my wired Ethernet through the CyberPower Ethernet in/out outlet on the back of the UPS. And I connected a USB cable from UPS to my desktop PC.


I previous had downloaded the CyberPower "PowerPanel" software, thinking I would install it after booting my PC (plugged in to the UPS), but to my surprise after booting my PC (running openSUSE-15.0 with KDE), I noted this icon in the right corner of my desktop.


Nominally I only see that with a laptop computer, ... but I confess nothing in my (albeit limited) research, suggested that I should expect that for a desktop plugged into the UPS. So it was a pleasant surprise.

I figure it must have been because I connected the UPS to the desktop also via the USB.

If one clicks on the corner desktop icon one will see this:


I also went through the KDE power management settings and tuned them a bit.

I ran the PC for a couple days with the KDE power management in place, and then I decided to go ahead on install the more powerful CyberPower command line "Power Panel" program for GNU/Linux.

.... To be continued in following post ....
.

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  1. oldcpu's Avatar
    After a couple of days with the UPS setup, I installed the rpm version of the CyberPower "powerpanel" software, which can be located on their website here.

    In addition for MS-Windows and MacOS installation downloads, they also have downloads for GNU/Linux, where it is packaged as a .deb, rpm, and .tar. I downloaded the 64-bit rpm "PPL_64bit (rpm)_v1.3.2.rpm" .

    Installation

    I simply used zypper to install (with root permissions):
    Code:
    zypper in PPL_64bit (rpm)_v1.3.2.rpm
    and I selected to ignore that the package was not signed.

    I received some errors as part of the install, suggesting to me the install was successful, but that the daemon did not start. These being:
    Code:
    //etc/init.d/pwrstatd,start=2,3,4,5 doesn't exist at /sbin/insserv line 246. 
    ...
    /sbin/insserv failed, exit code 1
    redirecting to systemctl start pwrstatd.service
    Failed to start pwrstatd.service: Unit pwrstatd.service not found.
    I checked the /etc directory and I noted the various scripts installed
    • hibernate.sh
    • pwrstadt-email.sh
    • pwrstadt-lowbatt.sh
    • pwrstadt-powerfail.sh
    • pwrstadt.conf
    • shutdown.sh


    Starting the daemon via the Service Manager

    I then checked under YaST > System > Services Manager, and I did not see "pwrstatd" listed as a service. That suggested it was not yet detected by the openSUSE LEAP-15.0 system after the rpm install (as suggested by the errors). I speculated that it might be detected after a restart of the services manager, so I rebooted, and again when into YaST > System > Services Manager. This time I noted the service present, but it was not running:



    Further not only was it "Inactive(Dead)" but it was on a Start=Manually. So I changed the Start=On Boot, and activated the service. This is what I see then:


    .


    Status of the UPS via Power Panel

    Nominally 'pwrstat' requires root permissions to run. With the service started, I then typed :
    Code:
     linux-p15v:/etc # pwrstat -config
    
    Daemon Configuration:
    
    Alarm .............................................. On
    Hibernate .......................................... Off
    
    Action for Power Failure:
    
            Delay time since Power failure ............. 60 sec.
            Run script command ......................... On
            Path of script command ..................... /etc/pwrstatd-powerfail.sh
            Duration of command running ................ 0 sec.
            Enable shutdown system ..................... On
    
    Action for Battery Low:
    
            Remaining runtime threshold ................ 300 sec.
            Battery capacity threshold ................. 35 %.
            Run script command ......................... On
            Path of command ............................ /etc/pwrstatd-lowbatt.sh
            Duration of command running ................ 0 sec.
            Enable shutdown system ..................... On
    I figured that a good sign, indicating it was now running as a daemon, using default emergency settings.

    Edit configuration files and restarting the pwrstatd service

    I then opened (with root permissions such that I could edit if desired) the file "/etc/pwrstadt.conf". I made a couple of changes, and saved the file. I noted the file stated to restart the daemon, to type:
    Code:
    /etc/init.d/pwrstatd restart
    but that yielded:
    Code:
    linux-p15v:/etc # /etc/init.d/pwrstatd restart
    redirecting to systemctl restart pwrstatd.service
    Simply typing:
    Code:
    systemctl restart pwrstatd.service
    worked fine.
    .

    Various Power Panel commands

    One can obtain the various command options from the pwrstat program by typing:
    Code:
    pwrstat -help
    and get status by typing:
    Code:
    pwrstat -status
    There is a good man page, which can be read by typing:
    Code:
    man pwrstat
    Its a pretty basic command line series of configuration files ... at least it is for myself, and reminds me of my early days in GNU/Linux over 20 years ago.
    .
  2. oldcpu's Avatar
    Out of curiousity, I plugged my monitor into my PC (together with low power speakers and the desktop PC itself), and then I removed the input power to the UPS. I did this to check the load. This is what "pwrstat -status" yields:


    and this is what "pwrstat -status" yields after power is restored to the UPS.

    The load only being ~90-watts surprised me, so I suspect that is inaccurate. Note the estimate of time in which power may be available, once on battery is down to ~31-minutes.