Blog Comments

  1. pbojczuk's Avatar
    Code:
    $RPMS | ForEach {
      rpm -q --queryformat "%{NAME}\n" $_ | out-null
      $? ? $INSRPMS.Add($_) : $MISRPMS.Add($_)
    }
    Przecież w Bashu też tak można, o czym zapomniałem skupiając się właśnie na poprawnym zbudowaniu i obsłużeniu tablicy:
    Code:
    for i in ${RPMS[@]}; do
      rpm -q --queryformat "%{NAME}\n" ${i} &> /dev/null
      [ $? -eq 0 ] && INSRPMS=(${INSRPMS[@]} $i) || MISRPMS=(${MISRPMS[@]} $i)
    done
  2. karlmistelberger's Avatar
    Many thanks for running the test and thoughtful commenting. Linpack is easy to use, but widely ignored by computer magazines. However users may even test their smartphones: https://media.ccc.de/v/35c3-9703-supermuc-ng#t=1988 I run it on all machines I assemble, no matter whether users will stress their machines to the limit. Modern hardware performs thermal throttling thus avoiding overheating.
  3. oldcpu's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by idanka
    Hi!
    Tumbleweed how does your installation work?
    missing services, restart and no changes
    ....
    Checking for file conflicts: ....................................................................[done]
    (1/1) Installing: powerpanel-1.3.3-0.x86_64 .....................................................[done]
    Additional rpm output:
    /etc/init.d/pwrstatd: line 18: /etc/rc.status: No such file or directory
    Fail to setup daemon startup script when system booting!
    Did you check in YaST to see if you could start the service there?

    Note - you may be best to get specific help by posting/asking for help in one of the forum threads.
  4. oldcpu's Avatar
    Continuing from the above post ...

    From the perspective of that benchmark, it does appear I obtain a significant performance gain with the Lenovo X1C9 over the old Toshiba Z930, which is enough to satisfy myself. This was what I wanted in buying the newer laptop.

    I also like the superior interface functionality of this X1C9 in regards to Thunderbolt ... and its newer Bluetooth specification, and of course its superior display. It also has a larger nvme storage (1TB) than the 256GB SSD storage on my Toshiba. The X1C9's speakers can put out much more volume than the old Toshiba Z930 (meaning I may not carry a small USB portable travel speaker like I did with the Toshiba). I believe this laptop should be superior in every respect to my older laptop, except possibly weight, where this Lenovo X1C9 is about the same weight (possibly a smidgen heavier) than my old Toshiba Z930. Obtaining a light weight is very very important to me, and I came close to buying the lighter Lenovo Nano instead, but in the end went for the X1C9 mainly due to the X1C9 having more external interfaces..

    One very nice feature of this X1C9 is that GNU/Linux is supported by Lenovo for this laptop. While Lenovo nominally support Fedora and Ubuntu for this laptop (as they sell the X1C9 with those distros installed), on the Lenovo Linux forum they will support other distributions questions - which I believe is excellent on the part of Lenovo.

    As you can tell - at present time, I am a happy customer (of Lenovo).
    .
  5. oldcpu's Avatar
    OK, thanks.

    As I noted I am not nominally one for benchmarks.

    There are so many different benchmarks and to know which are most applicable as to how I use a computer is not something I have spent time to research. My very fuzzy understanding is assessing a computer's performance to assess benefit for an individual's use, depends on the same individual's nominal use of the computer.

    I believe there are CPU bench marks for mathematical calculations, benchmarks for video rendering, hard-drive/SSD/nvme storage benchmarks, benchmarks for I/O (ie USB I/O, thunderbolt I/O etc ... ), graphical display benchmarks, and even GPU calcuation benchmarks (?)(for machine learning and such).

    Reading the specs and skimming through various reviews on the Lenovo X1 Carbon Generation-9 (X1C9) I am very confident it is a significant step up from my older laptop, a Toshiba Z930 (where that Toshiba came out in 2012).

    Since you asked about a specific benchmark (and provided the command to run such) I ran that command. Also since my interest was an improvement over my old laptop (and not so much against any one else's device) I ran that against my older laptop.

    This is the benchmark against my new Lenovo X1C9 which is likely more relevant to this thread, and also more likely of interest to anyone reading this thread:

    Code:
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~/rpms/benchmarks_2021.2.0/linux/mkl/benchmarks/linpack> ./runme_xeon64
    This is a SAMPLE run script for running a shared-memory version of
    Intel(R) Distribution for LINPACK* Benchmark. Change it to reflect
    the correct number of CPUs/threads, problem input files, etc..
    *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    Sat 13 Nov 2021 05:32:45 PM +07
    Sample data file lininput_xeon64.
    
    Current date/time: Sat Nov 13 17:32:45 2021
    
    CPU frequency:    4.088 GHz
    Number of CPUs: 1
    Number of cores: 4
    Number of threads: 4
    
    Parameters are set to:
    
    Number of tests: 15
    Number of equations to solve (problem size) : 1000  2000  5000  10000 15000 18000 20000 22000 25000 26000 27000 30000 35000 40000 45000
    Leading dimension of array                  : 1000  2000  5008  10000 15000 18008 20016 22008 25000 26000 27000 30000 35000 40000 45000
    Number of trials to run                     : 4     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     1     1     1     1     1    
    Data alignment value (in Kbytes)            : 4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     1     1     1     1    
    
    Maximum memory requested that can be used=16200901024, at the size=45000
    
    =================== Timing linear equation system solver ===================
    
    Size   LDA    Align. Time(s)    GFlops   Residual     Residual(norm) Check
    1000   1000   4      0.005      135.8550 1.052710e-12 3.143422e-02   pass
    1000   1000   4      0.004      169.0633 1.052710e-12 3.143422e-02   pass
    1000   1000   4      0.004      166.8704 1.052710e-12 3.143422e-02   pass
    1000   1000   4      0.004      165.6777 1.052710e-12 3.143422e-02   pass
    2000   2000   4      0.029      184.4839 4.597892e-12 3.588984e-02   pass
    2000   2000   4      0.028      189.7658 4.597892e-12 3.588984e-02   pass
    5000   5008   4      0.398      209.4370 2.669148e-11 3.543370e-02   pass
    5000   5008   4      0.402      207.6614 2.669148e-11 3.543370e-02   pass
    10000  10000  4      3.169      210.4173 9.466089e-11 3.192014e-02   pass
    10000  10000  4      3.321      200.8272 9.466089e-11 3.192014e-02   pass
    15000  15000  4      16.591     135.6422 2.224910e-10 3.365899e-02   pass
    15000  15000  4      17.794     126.4729 2.224910e-10 3.365899e-02   pass
    18000  18008  4      30.179     128.8540 2.999166e-10 3.174851e-02   pass
    18000  18008  4      30.020     129.5363 2.999166e-10 3.174851e-02   pass
    20000  20016  4      40.980     130.1637 3.406316e-10 2.914867e-02   pass
    20000  20016  4      40.953     130.2486 3.406316e-10 2.914867e-02   pass
    22000  22008  4      54.296     130.7576 4.453436e-10 3.156515e-02   pass
    22000  22008  4      54.281     130.7935 4.453436e-10 3.156515e-02   pass
    25000  25000  4      79.603     130.8735 5.747349e-10 3.169419e-02   pass
    25000  25000  4      79.572     130.9236 5.747349e-10 3.169419e-02   pass
    26000  26000  4      89.467     130.9832 5.959303e-10 3.043206e-02   pass
    26000  26000  4      89.481     130.9622 5.959303e-10 3.043206e-02   pass
    27000  27000  4      99.950     131.3000 7.263368e-10 3.444243e-02   pass
    30000  30000  1      136.744    131.6459 8.100526e-10 3.118683e-02   pass
    35000  35000  1      217.075    131.6864 1.095406e-09 3.095182e-02   pass
    40000  40000  1      323.903    131.7366 1.273924e-09 2.766933e-02   pass
    45000  45000  1      506.997    119.8311 1.813956e-09 3.114033e-02   pass
    
    Performance Summary (GFlops)
    
    Size   LDA    Align.  Average  Maximal
    1000   1000   4       159.3666 169.0633
    2000   2000   4       187.1248 189.7658
    5000   5008   4       208.5492 209.4370
    10000  10000  4       205.6223 210.4173
    15000  15000  4       131.0575 135.6422
    18000  18008  4       129.1951 129.5363
    20000  20016  4       130.2061 130.2486
    22000  22008  4       130.7756 130.7935
    25000  25000  4       130.8985 130.9236
    26000  26000  4       130.9727 130.9832
    27000  27000  4       131.3000 131.3000
    30000  30000  1       131.6459 131.6459
    35000  35000  1       131.6864 131.6864
    40000  40000  1       131.7366 131.7366
    45000  45000  1       119.8311 119.8311
    
    Residual checks PASSED
    
    End of tests
    
    Done: Sat 13 Nov 2021 06:07:08 PM +07
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~/rpms/benchmarks_2021.2.0/linux/mkl/benchmarks/linpack>
    For my own edification, I also ran that 'benchmark' against very old Toshbia Z930 laptop (which has a Core-i7 3667U CPU). I note my Toshiba Z930 was not able to run the full benchmark range :
    Code:
    oldcpu@localhost:~/rpms/benchmarks_2021.2.0/linux/mkl/benchmarks/linpack> ./runme_xeon64
    This is a SAMPLE run script for running a shared-memory version of
    Intel(R) Distribution for LINPACK* Benchmark. Change it to reflect
    the correct number of CPUs/threads, problem input files, etc..
    *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    Sun Nov 14 09:01:31 +07 2021
    Sample data file lininput_xeon64.
    
    Current date/time: Sun Nov 14 09:01:31 2021
    
    CPU frequency:    3.192 GHz
    Number of CPUs: 1
    Number of cores: 2
    Number of threads: 2
    
    Parameters are set to:
    
    Number of tests: 15
    Number of equations to solve (problem size) : 1000  2000  5000  10000 15000 18000 20000 22000 25000 26000 27000 30000 35000 40000 45000
    Leading dimension of array                  : 1000  2000  5008  10000 15000 18008 20016 22008 25000 26000 27000 30000 35000 40000 45000
    Number of trials to run                     : 4     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     1     1     1     1     1    
    Data alignment value (in Kbytes)            : 4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     4     1     1     1     1    
    
    Maximum memory requested that can be used=12800801024, at the size=40000
    
    =================== Timing linear equation system solver ===================
    
    Size   LDA    Align. Time(s)    GFlops   Residual     Residual(norm) Check
    1000   1000   4      0.032      20.8308  1.108169e-12 3.311275e-02   pass
    1000   1000   4      0.028      23.8896  1.108169e-12 3.311275e-02   pass
    1000   1000   4      0.025      26.6411  1.108169e-12 3.311275e-02   pass
    1000   1000   4      0.028      24.0372  1.108169e-12 3.311275e-02   pass
    2000   2000   4      0.156      34.2321  4.780135e-12 3.797053e-02   pass
    2000   2000   4      0.156      34.1773  4.780135e-12 3.797053e-02   pass
    5000   5008   4      2.188      38.1164  2.585496e-11 3.402825e-02   pass
    5000   5008   4      2.256      36.9612  2.585496e-11 3.402825e-02   pass
    10000  10000  4      17.274     38.6045  8.918638e-11 3.006692e-02   pass
    10000  10000  4      17.394     38.3398  8.918638e-11 3.006692e-02   pass
    15000  15000  4      78.718     28.5889  2.052349e-10 3.094689e-02   pass
    15000  15000  4      83.614     26.9148  2.052349e-10 3.094689e-02   pass
    18000  18008  4      152.687    25.4681  2.830931e-10 2.992661e-02   pass
    18000  18008  4      144.801    26.8552  2.830931e-10 2.992661e-02   pass
    20000  20016  4      208.456    25.5887  3.773184e-10 3.239039e-02   pass
    20000  20016  4      198.428    26.8820  3.773184e-10 3.239039e-02   pass
    22000  22008  4      268.268    26.4647  5.157639e-10 3.658542e-02   pass
    22000  22008  4      271.300    26.1690  5.157639e-10 3.658542e-02   pass
    25000  25000  4      396.423    26.2798  5.611069e-10 3.098006e-02   pass
    25000  25000  4      412.766    25.2393  5.611069e-10 3.098006e-02   pass
    26000  26000  4      474.254    24.7097  6.411192e-10 3.263811e-02   pass
    26000  26000  4      465.019    25.2005  6.411192e-10 3.263811e-02   pass
    27000  27000  4      660.732    19.8620  6.859950e-10 3.255930e-02   pass
    30000  30000  1      1169.022   15.3990  7.734124e-10 2.978534e-02   pass
    35000  35000  1      2918.538   9.7946   1.032016e-09 2.921610e-02   pass
    ./runme_xeon64: line 41:  2711 Killed                  $numacmd ./xlinpack_$arch lininput_$arch
    Done: Sun Nov 14 11:34:59 +07 2021
    oldcpu@localhost:~/rpms/benchmarks_2021.2.0/linux/mkl/benchmarks/linpack>
    I ran the benchmark twice to be certain, and both times it stopped at the same place with my old Toshiba Z930.
  6. karlmistelberger's Avatar
    [QUOTE=oldcpu;bt1280]In short - no.

    Thanks for the suggestion, but I confess that running benchmarks is not a particular interest of mine. Suffice to say this Lenovo X1C9 is a massive improvement over the i7-3667U CPU in my old Toshiba Z930 (where I purchased that Toshiba in June-2013). Further the nvme SSD in this Carbon X1G9 is faster than the SSD in my old Toshiba Z930 - where this is no surprise as that Toshiba hardware (and its still functioning SSD) is over 8-years old.

    After reading your post, I did download the Intel® oneAPI Math Kernel Library (oneMKL) Benchmarks Suite tarball (software), and looked inside the tarball. Its not intuitively obvious as to how to edit/run the script for the Tiger Lake Core-i7-1065G7 CPU in my Carbon X1G9 (nor run on my old core-i7-4770 CPU based desktop PC nor on my Toshiba Z930 core-i7-3667U laptop, nor on my even older core-i7-920 CPU based desktop PC either) and given my not having a strong interest in benchmarks, and also given 1st editing the benchmark script followed by running the benchmark script is recommended by the readme.txt file that comes with that package, I note that it is not intuitively obvious how to run (where for me a study of the tarball is needed). Hence I elected not to spend the time to try and figure it out. So likely I will not pursue this further.

    A benchmark program would need be much more obvious on how to run before I took the time to run such.[/QUOTE]
    No intuition required. Run ./runme_xeon64 and post output:

    karl@i3-4130:~/Downloads/benchmarks_2021.2.0/linux/mkl/benchmarks/linpack> cat lin_xeon64.txt
    Do 21. Okt 12:16:21 CEST 2021
    Sample data file lininput_xeon64.

    Current date/time: Thu Oct 21 12:16:21 2021

    CPU frequency: 3.398 GHz
    Number of CPUs: 1
    Number of cores: 2
    Number of threads: 2

    Parameters are set to:

    Number of tests: 15
    Number of equations to solve (problem size) : 1000 2000 5000 10000 15000 18000 20000 22000 25000 26000 27000 30000 35000 40000 45000
    Leading dimension of array : 1000 2000 5008 10000 15000 18008 20016 22008 25000 26000 27000 30000 35000 40000 45000
    Number of trials to run : 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1
    Data alignment value (in Kbytes) : 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1

    Maximum memory requested that can be used=16200901024, at the size=45000

    =================== Timing linear equation system solver ===================

    Size LDA Align. Time(s) GFlops Residual Residual(norm) Check
    1000 1000 4 0.014 49.4279 1.150968e-12 3.449968e-02 pass
    1000 1000 4 0.012 56.4134 1.150968e-12 3.449968e-02 pass
    1000 1000 4 0.012 55.8050 1.150968e-12 3.449968e-02 pass
    1000 1000 4 0.012 56.0257 1.150968e-12 3.449968e-02 pass
    2000 2000 4 0.085 63.0172 4.198086e-12 3.329359e-02 pass
    2000 2000 4 0.084 63.5465 4.198086e-12 3.329359e-02 pass
    5000 5008 4 1.026 81.2428 2.548853e-11 3.354599e-02 pass
    5000 5008 4 1.025 81.3156 2.548853e-11 3.354599e-02 pass
    10000 10000 4 7.465 89.3281 9.941109e-11 3.352730e-02 pass
    10000 10000 4 7.462 89.3694 9.941109e-11 3.352730e-02 pass
    15000 15000 4 27.141 82.9164 1.931753e-10 2.912586e-02 pass
    15000 15000 4 24.620 91.4057 1.931753e-10 2.912586e-02 pass
    18000 18008 4 43.625 89.1372 3.179195e-10 3.367161e-02 pass
    18000 18008 4 47.449 81.9546 3.179195e-10 3.367161e-02 pass
    20000 20016 4 201.547 26.4659 3.447581e-10 2.966315e-02 pass
    20000 20016 4 57.388 92.9489 3.447581e-10 2.966315e-02 pass
    22000 22008 4 75.615 93.8924 4.128938e-10 2.933052e-02 pass
    22000 22008 4 76.457 92.8573 4.128938e-10 2.933052e-02 pass
    25000 25000 4 109.717 94.9528 6.607437e-10 3.641903e-02 pass
    25000 25000 4 109.437 95.1960 6.607437e-10 3.641903e-02 pass
    26000 26000 4 122.875 95.3704 5.872723e-10 2.991647e-02 pass
    26000 26000 4 123.091 95.2033 5.872723e-10 2.991647e-02 pass
    27000 27000 4 137.248 95.6185 5.860798e-10 2.780977e-02 pass
    30000 30000 1 187.889 95.8111 7.834016e-10 3.015989e-02 pass
    35000 35000 1 323.327 88.4113 1.271780e-09 3.601975e-02 pass
    40000 40000 1 471.701 90.4595 1.371931e-09 2.976481e-02 pass
    Done: Do 21. Okt 12:54:41 CEST 2021
    karl@i3-4130:~/Downloads/benchmarks_2021.2.0/linux/mkl/benchmarks/linpack>
  7. oldcpu's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by karlmistelberger
    Did you ever consider real stress testing?

    Intel® oneAPI Math Kernel Library (oneMKL) Benchmarks Suite

    https://www.intel.com/content/www/us...rks-suite.html
    In short - no.

    Thanks for the suggestion, but I confess that running benchmarks is not a particular interest of mine. Suffice to say this Lenovo X1C9 is a massive improvement over the i7-3667U CPU in my old Toshiba Z930 (where I purchased that Toshiba in June-2013). Further the nvme SSD in this Carbon X1G9 is faster than the SSD in my old Toshiba Z930 - where this is no surprise as that Toshiba hardware (and its still functioning SSD) is over 8-years old.

    After reading your post, I did download the Intel® oneAPI Math Kernel Library (oneMKL) Benchmarks Suite tarball (software), and looked inside the tarball. Its not intuitively obvious as to how to edit/run the script for the Tiger Lake Core-i7-1065G7 CPU in my Carbon X1G9 (nor run on my old core-i7-4770 CPU based desktop PC nor on my Toshiba Z930 core-i7-3667U laptop, nor on my even older core-i7-920 CPU based desktop PC either) and given my not having a strong interest in benchmarks, and also given 1st editing the benchmark script followed by running the benchmark script is recommended by the readme.txt file that comes with that package, I note that it is not intuitively obvious how to run (where for me a study of the tarball is needed). Hence I elected not to spend the time to try and figure it out. So likely I will not pursue this further.

    A benchmark program would need be much more obvious on how to run before I took the time to run such.
  8. karlmistelberger's Avatar
    Did you ever consider real stress testing?

    Intel® oneAPI Math Kernel Library (oneMKL) Benchmarks Suite

    https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/developer/articles/technical/onemkl-benchmarks-suite.html
  9. oldcpu's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu
    OpenSUSE LEAP-15.3 uses TLP-1.3.1 as a tool to save battery power.
    Further surfing, and I noted this page for openSUSE on the TLP page: https://linrunner.de/tlp/installation/opensuse.html

    They recommend:
    The output of tlp-stat -b(version 1.2.2 or higher recommended) will guide you which external kernel module is required.

    So I ran that command as root and I obtained:
    Code:
    X1-Carbon-G9:/home/oldcpu # tlp-stat -b 
    --- TLP 1.3.1 -------------------------------------------- 
    
    +++ Battery Features: Charge Thresholds and Recalibrate 
    natacpi    = active (data, thresholds) 
    tpacpi-bat = inactive (kernel module 'acpi_call' not installed) 
    tp-smapi   = inactive (ThinkPad not supported) 
    
    +++ ThinkPad Battery Status: BAT0 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/manufacturer                   = Celxpert 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/model_name                     = 5B10W13974 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/cycle_count                    =      5 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/energy_full_design             =  57000 [mWh] 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/energy_full                    =  57380 [mWh] 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/energy_now                     =  57380 [mWh] 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/power_now                      =      0 [mW] 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/status                         = Full 
    
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/charge_start_threshold         =     96 [%] 
    /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/charge_stop_threshold          =    100 [%] 
    
    Charge                                                      =  100.0 [%] 
    Capacity                                                    =  100.7 [%] 
    
    +++ Recommendations 
    * Install acpi_call kernel module for ThinkPad battery recalibration
    So I may look into install acpi_call ( https://software.opensuse.org/package/acpi_call ) and loading the noted kernel module ... although I may research this some more first.
  10. oldcpu's Avatar
    I am not knowledgeable on power management for laptops, as typically I use my laptop sparingly - nominally only when travelling. When at home I use a desktop PC most of the time. I am also NOT a power user - and this laptop is a massive upgrade for me in computer processing power.

    Still, I note from reading the Lenovo GNU/Linux support forum (for GNU/Linux distributions other than openSUSE), that power management of a laptop, to try and extract the maxiumum performance from a laptop, appears to be a very important matter for some users, and I have been reading some of the threads on this topic with curiousity. Here is one sample Lenovo thread on this topic of Power management, where other GNU/Linux distros appear to prefer a different power management app approach than openSUSE LEAP-15.3.

    Also, an interesting article on GNU/Linux power management is this Linux Journaal article:
    https://www.linuxjournal.com/content...x-command-line

    I tried out some of the commands noted (where the X1C9 battery was fully charged at the time and the laptop plugged in to A/C power):
    Code:
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~> upower -i `upower -e | grep 'BAT'`
      native-path:          BAT0
      vendor:               Celxpert
      model:                5B10W13974
      serial:               5557
      power supply:         yes
      updated:              Wed 10 Nov 2021 10:12:02 AM +07 (56 seconds ago)
      has history:          yes
      has statistics:       yes
      battery
        present:             yes
        rechargeable:        yes
        state:               fully-charged
        warning-level:       none
        energy:              57.38 Wh
        energy-empty:        0 Wh
        energy-full:         57.38 Wh
        energy-full-design:  57 Wh
        energy-rate:         3.076 W
        voltage:             17.332 V
        percentage:          100%
        capacity:            100%
        technology:          lithium-polymer
        icon-name:          'battery-full-charged-symbolic'
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~>
    
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~> upower -i $(upower -e | grep BAT) | grep --color=never -E "state|to\ full|to\ empty|percentage"
        state:               fully-charged
        percentage:          100%
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~>
    
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~> cat /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/capacity
    100
    oldcpu@X1-Carbon-G9:~>
    OpenSUSE LEAP-15.3 uses TLP-1.3.1 as a tool to save battery power. Some information on "TLP" can be found here: https://linrunner.de/tlp/ . On that site I note TLP-1.4 was released on 24-Sept-2021. According to that site, the highlights of v.1-4 are:
    • Extended charge threshold support for laptops with a suitable kernel driver: ASUS, Huawei, LG, Lenovo (non-ThinkPad series), Samsung
    • Select a platform profile to control system operating characteristics around power/performance levels, thermal and fan speed
    • Enable Intel CPU HWP dynamic boost. I note "HWP" is "hardware-managed P-states" where I believe "P-states" are related to performance scaling of a CPU, and hence "HWP does the frequency scaling inside the CPU". I note "Sky Lake" CPUs can use this feature, and I suspect that the Tiger Lake CPU on my Lenovo X1C9 may support HWP, but I am not certain.

    Its not clear to me if I would obtain a significant (or even moderate) improvement from upgrading to that. At present thou this is all a mute point as TLP-1.4 is not yet packaged for openSUSE.

    On this topic, I note that LEAP-15.3 also uses the KDE Power Management module powerdevil5-5.18.5.

    As seen from the above examples of upower command, LEAP-15.3 also has the program upower-0.99.11-2.11 installed.

    I found it interesting that the program acpi is not nominally installed on my Lenovo X1C9, although acpi-1.7 is in the openSUSE-LEAP-15.3 OSS repository. Other battery management programs in the OSS repository not installed (where note not all of which are compatible with TLP) are programs such as laptop-mode-tools-1.69.2, powerd-2.0.2-1.1 (UPS monitoring daemon) and powerstat-0.02.18 (Laptop monitoring daemon). Further thermal management programs available in OSS repository, but not installed (and again one needs to be careful of possible conflicts with TLP) are themald-1.6 and tmon-1.0. Various other distros use thermald and not TLP, but at the moment I am not convinced that a better approach, as TLP appears to work well for me on this X1C9.

    After upgrading to the 5.14.11 kernel on LEAP-15.3 (as opposed to the older 5.3.18 kernel that comes with LEAP-15.3), I have no complaints with respect to power management. I have no desire at present time to conduct further kernel updates unless I believe appropriate for security reasons, or if I spot an aspect specific to my Laptop in a newer kernel change log.
    Updated 09-Nov-2021 at 21:28 by oldcpu
  11. idanka's Avatar
    Hi!
    Tumbleweed how does your installation work?
    missing services, restart and no changes

    zypper in ./PPL-1.3.3-64bit.rpm
    Loading repository data...
    Reading installed packages...
    Resolving package dependencies...

    The following NEW package is going to be installed:
    powerpanel

    1 new package to install.
    Overall download size: 119.4 KiB. Already cached: 0 B. After the operation, additional 330.3 KiB will
    be used.
    Continue? [y/n/v/...? shows all options] (y): y
    Retrieving package powerpanel-1.3.3-0.x86_64 (1/1), 119.4 KiB (330.3 KiB unpacked)
    PPL-1.3.3-64bit.rpm:
    Package is not signed!

    powerpanel-1.3.3-0.x86_64 (Plain RPM files cache): Signature verification failed [6-File is unsigned]
    Abort, retry, ignore? [a/r/i] (a): i

    Checking for file conflicts: ....................................................................[done]
    (1/1) Installing: powerpanel-1.3.3-0.x86_64 .....................................................[done]
    Additional rpm output:
    /etc/init.d/pwrstatd: line 18: /etc/rc.status: No such file or directory
    Fail to setup daemon startup script when system booting!