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Thread: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

  1. #1

    Default SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Greetings everyone,

    I'm not a professional when it comes to computers. I consider myself a hobbyist; and very much a sincere Linux enthusiast. I have a fairly extensive network for my home and home office, and recently I have began to coordinate my network to a single NTP server on my network. My box is SuSE 12.2; I'm able to use it just fine as a stratum 2 NTP server - I'm using a USNO peer. However, I'm becoming greedy with my seeking of furthering my understanding of NTP and I have been wanting to use a small GPS device ( DeLorme Earthmate BT-20) to turn my server to stratum 1.

    I've used open streets with my GPS and it seems to work fine. However, I can't seem to get the YaST NTP Configuration to recognize that I have an attached NMEA compliant device. I have set the drivers to "generic NMEA GPS Receiver"; I create a symlink - "/dev/serial/by-id/usb-DeLorme_Publishing_DeLorme_USB_Earthmate-if00-port0". BUT... when I display the log, I get:
    ntpd[3453]: ntpd exiting on signal 15

    ntpd[4407]: refclock_open /dev/gps0: No such file or directory

    ntpd[4407]: 127.127.20.0 interface 127.0.0.1 -> (none)

    I Thank You, if anyone out there in SuSE land can help me with this. Please try to keep it simple for me, as I'm not a computer professional.


    Respectfully

    Justin

    PS - I'm posting in the Network/Internet forum because the word "network" makes up the title "network time protocol."

  2. #2
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Welcome here.

    A few remarks (sorry no direct solution to your problem).

    1) There is not such a thing as SuSE for a long time. These forums are, as is explicitly stated on the main page at least, about openSUSE. And because you say the version you have is 12.2 I assume you also have openSUSE. (I say this because other version numbers could point to SUSE Linux, which is something different).

    2) You show some computer text in your post, which is OK and very much readable in this case. But in most cases computer output will be distorted to much when you post it as normal text. Thus please copy/paste computer text between CODE tags in a post. You get CODE tags ny using the # button in the toolbar of the post editor. And plaese when you want to show a command and it's output do so by copy/paste of the prompt, the command, the output and the next prompt between the CODE tags. This will show more then story telling about what you did.

    3) I never tried what you do here, but it is not clear what symlink you created to what. Again, like in 2), better do post the ln command, thus there can be no confusion of what is linked to what. Also, changing things within /dev (like making this link) is vulnarable in such a way that it is deleted at shutdown and not recreated after a boot. /dev is a temporary file system in RAM.

    4) What I read from the messages you got is that ntpd is missing /dev/gps0. You never mention that you created that one. Am I missing something?

    Hope this helps in getting the bug finding process on the way
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3

    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Mr. Velden,

    Sorry about my egregious spelling error with openSUSE. Your assumption is correct I am using openSUSE 12.2.

    I'm not an advanced user, so I try to avoid the command line interface if I can. Everything that I described in my first post can all be achieved thru the YaST GUI by selecting NTP Configuration. Everything I've done: creating the GPS profile, selecting the driver, creating the symlink, even displaying the log I’ve done it all through the GUI. That might play into why all the things I've shown in my posting aren't "distorted."

    As for your statement/question - "4) What I read from the messages you got is that ntpd is missing /dev/gps0. You never mention that you created that one. Am I missing something?" - I would have to say that I believe I have created it through the GUI process. If you think you have a better way that will recognize the GPS' NMEA ouptut by the NTPd; then please please please! instruct me.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Hm, as I said, I never tried to do what you did. It indeed did not come to my mind that you did this using YaST alone. And when somebody here says that he made a symbolic link, then he mostly means just that: typing
    Code:
    ln -s <some-existing-file> <some-link-to-it>
    A big misunderstanding. But it is, at least partly, created by the fact that you did not descibe exactly what you did. You apparently presuming that all other people immideatly would guess that correctly. This is most often not the case.

    Now describing exactty what one does and posting it is definitely more difficult for something done in a GUI (often requiring screen prints posted in a a paste=bin) then in the CLI. One of the reasons why we prefer the CLI in such cases.

    I tried to find out a bit about what your action could have been in start YaST > Network Services > NTP configuration. I guess you clicked then the Add button and choose something like Raioclock or so. Please explain what you did exactly there. And keep in mind that maybe none of the people here has ever done this (in the mean time hoping that someone tunes in here who has experience). Most are satisfied with seting up a connection to a server on their Lan or the Internet. Only a few will use their openSUSE as NTP server for their LAN. And that is about what is normal here.
    Last edited by hcvv; 24-Jan-2013 at 14:31.
    Henk van Velden

  5. #5

    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Mr. Velden,

    I believe what I will do is attempt to restate the process I have completed thus far with my - AMATEUR - attempt at making a home NTP server. I have no formal training with computers, operating system, etc.; so I am very much an amateur. I try to avoid the CLI when possible, unless I have step-by-step instructions of what to do; because I do know that you can really FUBAR your computer if you don't know what your doing. So everything that I will attempt to explain has only happened in the GUI.

    In my efforts to setup a personal NTP server (to coordinate my computers, cameras, clocks, etc., and -as a joke - in preparation for the zombie apocalypse) I begin by starting YaST > Network Services > NTP configuration. Initially, once established in the "Advanced NTP Configuration", in my process of creating my server - In the "Start NTP Daemon" article I have selected "now and on boot". In the synchronization list I established an address to the USNO - which from what I've read essentially makes my server setup stratum 2 (moot point).

    Today I am attempting to create a new synchronization type by selecting Add > Radio Clock. My radio clock is a DeLorme Earthmate BT-20 (NMEA 2.0) GPS receiver. In the Local Reference Clock menu - under clock type - I select "Generic NMEA GPS Receiver." Then I go to OK, which takes me back to the main "Advanced NTP Configuration". Again I click OK so that the NTP settings take effect and re-start the ntpd daemon.

    I then will go back into the "Advanced NTP Configuration" and the I will select "Display Log".
    The log output is:
    "24 Jan 23:15:47 ntpd[16559]: ntpd exiting on signal 15" - note1 = This I assume is good and is based on my Server Synch to the USNO
    "24 Jan 23:15:55 ntpd[16660]: refclock_open /dev/gps0: No such file or directory" - note2 = This is obviously the GPS, but the ntpd isn't finding the GPS
    "24 Jan 23:15:55 ntpd[16660]: 127.127.20.0 interface 127.0.0.1 -> (none)" - note3 = This I believe is in reference to the generic NMEA driver

    In reference to note2; I have used the udev-browse command to verify that my system is recognizing that my GPS is plugged in to my computer. It says that the GPS DEVPATH /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.1/usb6/6-2/6-2:1.0/ttyUSB0/tty/ttyUSB0. In the Local Reference Clock menu where it allows you to create a symlink; I have entered this information and it still results in the same log output.

    I hope that this has cleared up what I have been able to do so far. Now the question is: How do I trouble shoot and fix this issue so that ntpd will use my GPS as a clock reference?

    Thanks

    -Justin

  6. #6
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    On 1/25/2013 1:46 AM, USMCleather wrote:
    >
    > Mr. Velden,
    >
    > I believe what I will do is attempt to restate the process I have
    > completed thus far with my - AMATEUR - attempt at making a home NTP
    > server. I have no formal training with computers, operating system,
    > etc.; so I am very much an amateur. I try to avoid the CLI when
    > possible, unless I have step-by-step instructions of what to do; because
    > I do know that you can really FUBAR your computer if you don't know what
    > your doing. So everything that I will attempt to explain has only
    > happened in the GUI.
    >
    > In my efforts to setup a personal NTP server (to coordinate my
    > computers, cameras, clocks, etc., and -as a joke - in preparation for
    > the zombie apocalypse) I begin by starting YaST > Network Services > NTP
    > configuration. Initially, once established in the "Advanced NTP
    > Configuration", in my process of creating my server - In the "Start NTP
    > Daemon" article I have selected "now and on boot". In the
    > synchronization list I established an address to the USNO - which from
    > what I've read essentially makes my server setup stratum 2 (moot point).
    >
    > Today I am attempting to create a new synchronization type by selecting
    > Add > Radio Clock. My radio clock is a DeLorme Earthmate BT-20 (NMEA
    > 2.0) GPS receiver. In the Local Reference Clock menu - under clock type
    > - I select "Generic NMEA GPS Receiver." Then I go to OK, which takes me
    > back to the main "Advanced NTP Configuration". Again I click OK so that
    > the NTP settings take effect and re-start the ntpd daemon.
    >
    > I then will go back into the "Advanced NTP Configuration" and the I
    > will select "Display Log".
    > The log output is: "24 Jan 23:15:47 ntpd[16559]: ntpd exiting on
    > signal 15" - note1 = This I assume is good and is based on my Server
    > Synch to the USNO
    > "24 Jan 23:15:55 ntpd[16660]: refclock_open
    > /dev/gps0: No such file or directory" - note2 = This is obviously the
    > GPS, but the ntpd isn't finding the GPS
    >
    > "24 Jan 23:15:55 ntpd[16660]: 127.127.20.0
    > interface 127.0.0.1 -> (none)" - note3 = This I believe is in reference
    > to the generic NMEA driver
    > In reference to note2; I have used the udev-browse command to
    > verify that my system is recognizing that my GPS is plugged in to my
    > computer. It says that the GPS
    > _-DEVPATH_/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.1/usb6/6-2/6-2:1.0/ttyUSB0/tty/ttyUSB0-_.
    > In the Local Reference Clock menu where it allows you to create a
    > symlink; I have entered this information and it still results in the
    > same log output.
    >
    > I hope that this has cleared up what I have been able to do so far.
    > Now the question is: How do I trouble shoot and fix this issue so that
    > ntpd will use my GPS as a clock reference?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > -Justin
    >
    >

    Justin;

    I'm not sure this will help but try testing with AppArmor disabled. You may
    just need to edit the ntpd profile. Just an idea.

    --
    P.V.
    "We're all in this together, I'm pulling for you" Red Green

  7. #7
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Thanks for the explanation about what you did. Makes it a lot clearer for everybody I assume.
    I will think this over if I can advice something . The problem beingthat I can not experiment here, not having such a device. And that is true for most of us I am afraid.

    BTW, does the post of Justin ring a bell? I am not sure how he comes to the conclusion that you run AppArmor (I don't and if I am correct it is not installed or started by default).

    BTW, your fear of using the CLI is realy something you should get rid off. You manage Linux systems and while there are tools like YaST to help you in system management and that do have a GUI interface (YaST also has other interfaces), they mostly at the maximum cover the 80% of tasks mostly done. As soon as you venture into more exotic aereas you have to revert to the CLI. Also the CLI gives you a much better direct access to configuration file and the like because it leaves out the extra layer of interpretation of tools (GUI or not). Also advising on problems via the forums here is much, much easier by showiing CLI statements then makeing stories like: "and then there is button with a laughing face in the lower right corner of the left half of the window and .....". Same for reporting back here.
    Henk van Velden

  8. #8
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    Quote Originally Posted by USMCleather View Post

    In my efforts to setup a personal NTP server (to coordinate my computers, cameras, clocks, etc., and -as a joke - in preparation for the zombie apocalypse) I begin by starting YaST > Network Services > NTP configuration. Initially, once established in the "Advanced NTP Configuration", in my process of creating my server - In the "Start NTP Daemon" article I have selected "now and on boot". In the synchronization list I established an address to the USNO - which from what I've read essentially makes my server setup stratum 2 (moot point).
    Just as some talk about the background.

    I think it is not a bad idea to have one central NTP server in your LAN where all other system synchronise to. Advantages IMHO:
    . Less trafic out to the Internet (only one system synchronises with an NTP server on the Internet);
    . Even when the NTP server on the internet, or the whole internet connection, fails, internal synchronisation in the LAN is still available. This internal synchronisation can be important when e.g. system use each other's resources (NFS mount).

    I have done this several times in customer's networks (in the times that I was professional as a system manager).

    I, however never saw a direct timer resource (apart from the system clock) used in these cases. Nor the need for it. But I admit it is a nice excersise to see if one can get this working.
    Henk van Velden

  9. #9
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    And technical. Can you please post the output of the following two statments:
    Code:
    ls -l /dev/serial/*
    ls -l /dev/gps*
    Henk van Velden

  10. #10
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    Default Re: SuSE 12.2 NTP Server

    On 1/25/2013 4:06 AM, hcvv wrote:
    >

    <snip>
    > BTW, does the post of Justin ring a bell? I am not sure how he comes to
    > the conclusion that you run AppArmor (I don't and if I am correct it is
    > not installed or started by default).
    >

    <snip>
    >
    >

    Henk;

    I think you are refering to my earlier post. I currently run 11.4:Evergreen.
    For many years(releases) prior to 12.x, AppArmor was turned on by default.
    Perhaps there was a policy change at Opensuse. But I think it is still worth a
    look.

    --
    P.V.
    "We're all in this together, I'm pulling for you" Red Green

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