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Thread: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

  1. #1
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    Default Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    Hello,

    After the usb-keyboard and mouse problems with the previous kernel update I'm a bit reluctant to just install the new kernel.

    Is there a Yast way to keep the currently installed kernel when you do a kernel update with Yast?

    Of course I could make a backup of /boot and after the update, and before the reset, copy back the current kernel and edit /boot/grub/menu.lst to add an entry for the backup kernel. But that is something I'm likely to forget with future updates, so it would be nice if it was automatic...

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    Yes, it is possible to keep both your old and new kernels. You need to change how YaST Software Management works with kernel updates, to allow you to maintain both the old kernel and the newer kernel.

    edit the file /etc/zypp/zypp.conf to say:

    Code:
    ##
    ## Packages which can be installed in different versions at the same time.
    ##
    ## Packages are selected either by name, or by provides. In the later case
    ## the string must start with "provides:" immediately followed by the capability.
    ##
    ## Example:
    ##    kernel                - just packages whith name 'kernel'
    ##    provides:multiversion(kernel)   - all packages providing 'multiversion(kernel)'
    ##                      (kenel and kmp packages should do this)
    ## Valid values:
    ##    Comma separated list of packages.
    ##
    ## Default value:
    ##    empty
    ##
    # multiversion = provides:multiversion(kernel)
    
    multiversion = kernel-desktop
    If you use KDE, you can use the menu Run Command:

    Code:
    kdesu kwrite /etc/zypp/zypp.conf
    The file zypp.conf has a whole lot more in it than the small portion shown above. You are adding only the line shown in bold (and it will not be in bold in your file after being added. So be careful not to mess anything else up. caf 4926, posted a page from Software Management showing how to then select the added kernel, though this is from the newer openSUSE 11.4, in beta testing right now.

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10573557/SUS...dio-switch.png

    After making the change, restart your computer and then do the following after you are logged back into openSUSE:

    menu / System / YaST & Enter Root User Password, then in YaST Select:

    Software Management / View (top Left) / Package Groups / Multiversion Packages

    There will be a listing for your loaded kernel. Now select the Versions Tab. Notice on the versions tab that instead of having a Bullet to select, where only one bullet can be active, you now have check blocks and more than one check can be selected.

    Now when you select more than one kernel to be loaded, each installed kernel will have two (or more) entries made in your grub, menu.lst file. Thus allowing you to select both the old and new kernel loads. If you install a new kernel and normally install a binary video driver, the hard way, you must reinstall the video driver for each new kernel that you install.

    Finally, I have a script file that you can use to compile and install the very latest kernel which also maintains (and does not replace) your old kernel. This thread is located at:

    S.A.K.C - SuSE Automated Kernel Compiler

    This is not something a new user would do, but I don't really know your user level here. Be aware that if you load many kernels, you may begin to forget just what kernel does what, so take it easy and don't blow yourself up which a bunch of kernel installs.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

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    Default Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    Ok, this isn't a Yast way, but ok...

    Is the "restart your computer" necessary? Because without it the bullets already changed to checkmark blocks in the version tab?

    And shouldn't you use the "multiversion = provides:multiversion(kernel)" so you can also install multiple versions of "preload kmp desktop", which seems to be tied to kernel versions?

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    Smile Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    wvv
    Ok, this isn't a Yast way, but ok...

    Is the "restart your computer" necessary? Because without it the bullets already changed to checkmark blocks in the version tab?

    And shouldn't you use the "multiversion = provides:multiversion(kernel)" so you can also install multiple versions of "preload kmp desktop", which seems to be tied to kernel versions?
    The restart request is just normal procedure. If the changes show up with out it, then even better.

    The changes you making just modifies how the YaST Software Management treats multiple versions of the kernel, so that you can have more than one version, just in case the latest one you does not work. I consider this using YaST, just being modified in how it works.

    As for "multiversion = provides:multiversion(kernel)", I asked the same question and I was told that the right one was to use "multiversion = kernel-desktop". Which does work as stated.You are welcome to try any other options that you like and report back as to if that is better or not to use.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

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    Default Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    To have multiple kernels, one just installs the different flavours (default, desktop, pae) - But you didn't initially ask that. You wanted to keep your original kernel and get the New one too.

    Which was explained for you. You can see a post about it here
    Keyboard & mouse freezes

    preload kmp desktop: Is a module that 'Preloads' stuff to speed up booting
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    Quote Originally Posted by caf4926 View Post
    You wanted to keep your original kernel and get the New one too.

    Which was explained for you. You can see a post about it here
    Keyboard & mouse freezes

    preload kmp desktop: Is a module that 'Preloads' stuff to speed up booting
    I'm just cautious. The preload-kmp-desktop package requires a particular kernel. So when you boot the other kernel version. Is you're system still in working order, because the kernel that is required by preload-kmp-desktop, isn't booted. If the kernel version isn't a requirement for the preload-kmp-desktop, why is it specified in the rpm? This doesn't seem logical to me, one way or another...

  7. #7
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    Smile Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    preload-kmp-desktop is not a kernel, but a kernel module and I am sure it is designed to work with some sort of kernel version range. Since most kernel updates are for the same base version, you may only have a problem if you decide to jump up from kernel 2.6.34 to 2.6.35 or 2.6.36, so it does not appear to be a problem when you getting security updates installed. Further, now you can have both the old and new kernels to try or drop back to if required.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    Just to report back on this:

    I did the kernel update, and kept the current kernel in Yast. After this Yast update, both kernels were in /boot and /boot/grub/menu.lst had both kernels as menu selections. So everything worked as expected. The new kernel is working fine, so I didn't test if the old kernel still works.

    A suggestion, as this seems to be a recurring theme in this forum: Maybe keeping the current kernel should be the default and automatic behaviour for a kernel update through Yast! (Provided there is enough space on the partition that holds /boot)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    I've also thought that keeping the current kernel should be the default, but what could then happen is the /boot partition will fill up with very old kernels. There would be just as many questions in this forum on how to delete old kernels, so the sum result would be the same. I still think you're correct, keeping kernels should be the default. It's less traumatic to the user.
    Box: Home Built | Intel Core2 @2.4 GHz | 6 GB | OpenSUSE 11.4| KDE 4.6.0 r6| nVidia GeForce 7300 GT

  10. #10
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    Smile Re: Keeping the current kernel when doing a kernel update through yast

    A suggestion, as this seems to be a recurring theme in this forum: Maybe keeping the current kernel should be the default and automatic behaviour for a kernel update through Yast! (Provided there is enough space on the partition that holds /boot)
    Actually I like that idea wvv. Perhaps that should be suggested to the guys (and gals) working on the next release of openSUSE 11.4.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

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