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Thread: nVidia 310M on Intel i5?

  1. #1

    Default nVidia 310M on Intel i5?

    Hi,

    On my new computer, I have not been able to get the nVidia 310M graphics to function. I installed the proprietary nvidia driver from the appropriate repository ( http://download.nvidia.com/opensuse/11.3/ ) and generated an Xorg.conf file using nvidia-xconfig it but it refuses to load.

    The following lines from Xorg.0.log seem to indicate that the driver can't find any displays attached.
    Code:
    [    14.255] (EE) No devices detected.
    [    14.255] Fatal server error:
    [    14.255] no screens found
    Appropriate lspci output:
    Code:
    00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Core Processor Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 18)
    01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation GT218 [GeForce 310M] (rev a2)
    Any ideas on why this isn't working? The nvidia driver is loaded in the kernel, and I have tried blacklisting the intel_agp and i915 kernel modules to no success.

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: nVidia 310M on Intel i5?

    So I presume this is a laptop with dual graphics chips? Did you add the nomodeset to your kernel load options? Generally, I recommend you download and install the nVidia driver the hard way, as opposed to using the repository method. I ask that you read though the following information which was not specifically created for your situation, but it may still be helpful:

    You should look at this document before proceeding on...

    SDB:Configuring graphics cards - openSUSE

    Then, take a look at the procedure I use to install the nVidia driver as I install openSUSE 11.3:

    1. During the install, when you have the option to change your booting setup, I add nomodeset to the kernel load command for the normal load/start of openSUSE. This kernel startup option is already present for the Failsafe selection for openSUSE.
    2. During the first start of openSUSE, I download the latest nVidia Video driver to the downloads folder.
    3. I change/save the System/Kernel option NO_KMS_IN_INITRD from "No" to "Yes" in the /etc/sysconfig Editor in Yast.
    4. I do an update of openSUSE on the first run of openSUSE and then a restart/reboot.
    5. In grub OS selection I add the command line option "3" to the openSUSE start line so that I just go to the run level three terminal prompt.
    6. I login in as root and change to the /home/user/Downloads folder.
    7. I run/install the NVIDIA video driver using "sh ./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-256.53.run" and answer all questions as appropriate for my system.
    8. Type in reboot at terminal prompt to restart the system with new video driver.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3

    Default Re: nVidia 310M on Intel i5?

    Unfortunately that didn't work. I have found why it didn't work however. My system has "Nvidia Optimus" technology which effectively means the Nvidia card outputs via the Intel card.

    From my searching, it appears Nvidia aren't interested in implementing this for now
    However, some efforts are being organised to help the Nouveau devs, so there is some hope in the future.
    https://launchpad.net/~hybrid-graphics-linux

  4. #4
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    Default Re: nVidia 310M on Intel i5?

    Ben_Cook2, anytime you go with the latest technology, there is a possibility it has not yet been made to work under Linux. I would also say that it is just a matter of time though before it does work. So far every new thing I have used has also made its way to Linux, even my Creative Labs X-Fi sound cards did so even as I thought it would never happen. But now, they work like a champ under Linux and openSUSE. The exception seems to happen from small manufacturers, but nVidia is a major player. So hang it there as it will happen for you.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

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