Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: self inflicted wound--root password

  1. #1

    Default self inflicted wound--root password

    I recently installed openSuse after using Mandriva for a while. In Mandriva I was able to su to root and then use

    passwd -d root

    to disable the root password. In my case the password is an unnecessary nuisance.

    I tried this on openSUSE this morning, and now I get the message "SU returned with an error" if I try to use Yast or anything else that requires root permission.

    Is there any way, short of reinstalling openSUSE, that I can fix this?

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    Quote Originally Posted by rlaconte View Post
    I recently installed openSuse after using Mandriva for a while. In Mandriva I was able to su to root and then use

    passwd -d root

    to disable the root password. In my case the password is an unnecessary nuisance.

    I tried this on openSUSE this morning, and now I get the message "SU returned with an error" if I try to use Yast or anything else that requires root permission.

    Is there any way, short of reinstalling openSUSE, that I can fix this?

    Thanks
    You deleted the root password
    Try logging in as root and see if you can login with suse not asking for the password. Maybe best is using yast to configure it without the root using a password if it is permissible.
    People who do not break things first will never learn to create anything

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vsters, Sweden ex. Highbury London UK
    Posts
    1,282

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    You may feel that have to use is an "unnecessary nuisance" but this is part of what makes Linux so secure and free from viruses and malware.
    To get it back have a read here and here

    Geoff
    Quote Originally Posted by rlaconte View Post
    I recently installed openSuse after using Mandriva for a while. In Mandriva I was able to su to root and then use

    passwd -d root

    to disable the root password. In my case the password is an unnecessary nuisance.

    I tried this on openSUSE this morning, and now I get the message "SU returned with an error" if I try to use Yast or anything else that requires root permission.

    Is there any way, short of reinstalling openSUSE, that I can fix this?

    Thanks
    Core 2 Duo 3.16GHz, 8GB DDR2, 3.5TB, GeForce 9600 GT, Amilo LCD 26", OS 11.1 x86_64, KDE4.2.4 (2)
    My wine tips & tricks

  4. #4

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    There was an old thread here regarding the password recovery.
    How to reset lost root password - openSUSE Forums

    See if it will help.

    Opps there was another link from geoffro that is almost similar and more clear.
    Anyway I think the link originated from this archived thread if memory serves.
    People who do not break things first will never learn to create anything

  5. #5

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    Thanks for the good advice. Took me a while to read it all and try all the suggestions. Unfortunately, none of them worked.

    I was able to boot in as root and enter and confirm a new password. That should have fixed it. But when I booted back into the openSUSE GUI, I continued to receive the "SU returned an error" message whenever I tried to get root privileges.

    So I stopped trying and just reinstalled openSUSE. No more problem.

    geoffro, I appreciate the benefit that unix password protection affords. For people who use a computer for important things whether at work or at home, it is foolish to try to bypass it. But I've been retired for over 20 years and use my computer strictly for fun. It is essentially a toy with which I play. There is absolutely nothing on it of any value, not even my real name. Without any data to lose or dependence on the machine for anything but enjoyment, entering the root password is just an annoying interruption. Especially in my case. I don't use my comp to play games or look at videos, etc. I test software and try to learn the computer's capabilities. So I require root privileges much more often than people who do useful things.

    If I can't turn it off in openSuse, I'll probably go back to Mandriva or some other distribution that will let me, even (perish the thought) Windows.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vsters, Sweden ex. Highbury London UK
    Posts
    1,282

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    If that's the case just run it as root if you don't mind breaking things
    Quote Originally Posted by rlaconte View Post
    ...
    geoffro, I appreciate the benefit that unix password protection affords. For people who use a computer for important things whether at work or at home, it is foolish to try to bypass it. But I've been retired for over 20 years and use my computer strictly for fun. It is essentially a toy with which I play.... ..
    Core 2 Duo 3.16GHz, 8GB DDR2, 3.5TB, GeForce 9600 GT, Amilo LCD 26", OS 11.1 x86_64, KDE4.2.4 (2)
    My wine tips & tricks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    UTC+10
    Posts
    9,941
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    Quote Originally Posted by rlaconte View Post
    geoffro, I appreciate the benefit that unix password protection affords. For people who use a computer for important things whether at work or at home, it is foolish to try to bypass it. But I've been retired for over 20 years and use my computer strictly for fun. It is essentially a toy with which I play. There is absolutely nothing on it of any value, not even my real name. Without any data to lose or dependence on the machine for anything but enjoyment, entering the root password is just an annoying interruption. Especially in my case. I don't use my comp to play games or look at videos, etc. I test software and try to learn the computer's capabilities. So I require root privileges much more often than people who do useful things.
    If you are not connected to the Net or you don't mind the risk of shooting yourself in the foot, feel free to run as root. Most likely nothing will happen, but then again, the need to run as root is much less than people seem to imagine. Especially if you are just "testing software". If you had said experimenting with hardware I might agree you have some justification. It also prevents you from learning about the Unix/Linux permission system.

    However to clear a misconception, what is valuable to intruders is not just your data, but your computer's connections. Sure, some identity details would be nice to steal, but even without sensitive data a computer connected to a broadband connection makes a nice spam spreading machine.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Kln, Deutschland
    Posts
    1,204

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    rlancote:

    Have a quick look at this thread:

    How to solve kdesus prompt for a password in openSUSE 11.0 - openSUSE Forums

    ...then the easiest way is to follow the instructions here:

    Default kdesu to use sudo and not su | Ben Kevan's Blog

    It depends on which version of KDE you are using (if you are using KDE of course!),

    It makes the whole desktop much smoother, it won't even prompt you for a password when your account is admin capable, and is better than running as root as some software actually refuses to run, and you might get the annoying "running as superuser" message on each login.

    I understand the nuisance factor, especially if you are a little older and or have memory problems or sight problems, and that will fix it.

    Have fun

  9. #9
    op Deres NNTP User

    Default Re: self inflicted wound--root password

    but, IF it is connected to the net, and IF a root kit gets installed, it could
    join the legion of windoz bots in pumping out spam, etc..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •